What’s in my box this week?

Click on your delivery date to see what is in your box this week. Note that the web site is updated daily to reflect the NEXT day’s deliveries but before that, will show the information from the previous week. You can check an earlier day in the week to get an idea of what will be in your box, but the contents of your box may be different as the box contents frequently change between days.

*Click on produce above for Recipes

Flower of the Week: Rudbeckia (Black-eyed Susans) and Safflower

Veggie Tips

Basil – To keep your basil fresh, store in a glass of water on the counter (NOT in the refrigerator) like you would flowers and cover with a bag. Change the water regularly. Or you can use it up all at once in a batch of pesto which can include carrot tops (like this recipe) or even zucchini! Other ideas: zucchini stir-fry (see the Recipe of the Week), potato salad, cabbage salad, zucchini salad, bean and zucchini salad, one pot zucchini pasta (with ricotta or mascarpone), with peaches and cheese, or hummus (just zucchini ormore traditional). Many more recipes on our website.

Cabbage – Cabbage is one of the most versatile vegetables around – see our website’s cabbage page for proof. It stores well too (refrigerated, in a bag). For really long storage, make sauerkraut! You can easily make a small batch in a mason jar.

Carrots – Separate the roots from the greens before storing them in the refrigerator to help them stay crunchy and crisp. If they do get a little limp, you can revive them by putting them in water, even for just five minutes. Give your carrot greens a try! We’ve heard from several of you that you like making carrot top pesto or salsa verde. They can also be used in a broth, chimichurri, or soup. Check out the other carrot recipes on our website.

New Potatoes – It is CRUCIAL that you keep new potatoes refrigerated, as you would any highly perishable produce. The skins are very thin and fragile and might get a little scuffed in the harvesting and washing process. Read more about how we grow and harvest potatoes here and for folks who want to know, see the photo that identifies the varieties that we’re growing this year. 

New potatoes have less starch and a higher water content than older potatoes so they’re very creamy and sweet, a real treat. They can be used as you would any “less-new” potato: steamed, sautéed, boiled, roasted, and grilled; this website has tips for any of those basic preparation methods. Dru’s favorite way to enjoy them is to steam or boil and then smash on her plate with a fork. We love them roasted too and in potato salad. They really don’t need much added to taste good. You can find some additional recipe suggestions here and on our website.

Onions – The onions are now dried and do not need to be refrigerated.

Peaches – These are mostly Spring Flame, though we’re also starting to harvest some Zee Pride. Both are yellow peaches. We pick them a bit firm to (hopefully) get them to you with minimal bruising, but even when ripe, they’ll still be on the firmer side. Peaches are best stored on the counter, stem side down. If you want to speed up ripening, put them in a paper bag. If you need to slow down ripening, move them to the refrigerator, though extended time in a refrigerator can negatively impact their texture. See our website for a few recipe ideas, and make sure to read the News from the Farm this week – all about peaches.

Summer Squash – Squash should be stored in the fridge (ideally in the crisper drawer), and in a bag. The key is moisture management; you want to make sure that they don’t dry, but they will spoil if there is too much condensation. You may want to move your squash to a plastic bag, but make sure one end of the bag is open for air circulation. Don’t wash your squash until you’re ready to use them. And when you are, see the Recipe of the Week and we’ve got lots of ideas on our website, this list and this one have a few more, and also: grilled with new potatoes, a savory Italian tart, roasted with potatoes or carrots (or both), pickled, roasted, with noodles or pasta, smashed with lime, eggs, or bake something sweet. You don’t have to cook squash; you can make slaw, soba noodles, grain salad, or simple carpaccio.

*Click on produce above for Recipes

Flower of the Week: Rudbeckia (Black-eyed Susans) and Safflower

Veggie Tips

Basil – To keep your basil fresh, store in a glass of water on the counter (NOT in the refrigerator) like you would flowers and cover with a bag. Change the water regularly. Or you can use it up all at once in a batch of pesto which can include carrot tops (like this recipe) or even zucchini! Other ideas: zucchini stir-fry (see the Recipe of the Week), potato salad, cabbage salad, zucchini salad, bean and zucchini salad, one pot zucchini pasta (with ricotta or mascarpone), with peaches and cheese, or hummus (just zucchini ormore traditional). Many more recipes on our website.

Cabbage – Cabbage is one of the most versatile vegetables around – see our website’s cabbage page for proof. It stores well too (refrigerated, in a bag). For really long storage, make sauerkraut! You can easily make a small batch in a mason jar.

Carrots – Separate the roots from the greens before storing them in the refrigerator to help them stay crunchy and crisp. If they do get a little limp, you can revive them by putting them in water, even for just five minutes. Give your carrot greens a try! We’ve heard from several of you that you like making carrot top pesto or salsa verde. They can also be used in a broth, chimichurri, or soup. Check out the other carrot recipes on our website.

New Potatoes – It is CRUCIAL that you keep new potatoes refrigerated, as you would any highly perishable produce. The skins are very thin and fragile and might get a little scuffed in the harvesting and washing process. Read more about how we grow and harvest potatoes here and for folks who want to know, see the photo that identifies the varieties that we’re growing this year. 

New potatoes have less starch and a higher water content than older potatoes so they’re very creamy and sweet, a real treat. They can be used as you would any “less-new” potato: steamed, sautéed, boiled, roasted, and grilled; this website has tips for any of those basic preparation methods. Dru’s favorite way to enjoy them is to steam or boil and then smash on her plate with a fork. We love them roasted too and in potato salad. They really don’t need much added to taste good. You can find some additional recipe suggestions here and on our website.

Onions – The onions are now dried and do not need to be refrigerated.

Peaches – These are mostly Spring Flame, though we’re also starting to harvest some Zee Pride. Both are yellow peaches. We pick them a bit firm to (hopefully) get them to you with minimal bruising, but even when ripe, they’ll still be on the firmer side. Peaches are best stored on the counter, stem side down. If you want to speed up ripening, put them in a paper bag. If you need to slow down ripening, move them to the refrigerator, though extended time in a refrigerator can negatively impact their texture. See our website for a few recipe ideas, and make sure to read the News from the Farm this week – all about peaches.

Summer Squash – Squash should be stored in the fridge (ideally in the crisper drawer), and in a bag. The key is moisture management; you want to make sure that they don’t dry, but they will spoil if there is too much condensation. You may want to move your squash to a plastic bag, but make sure one end of the bag is open for air circulation. Don’t wash your squash until you’re ready to use them. And when you are, see the Recipe of the Week and we’ve got lots of ideas on our website, this list and this one have a few more, and also: grilled with new potatoes, a savory Italian tart, roasted with potatoes or carrots (or both), pickled, roasted, with noodles or pasta, smashed with lime, eggs, or bake something sweet. You don’t have to cook squash; you can make slaw, soba noodles, grain salad, or simple carpaccio.

*Click on produce above for Recipes

Flower of the Week: Rudbeckia (Black-eyed Susans) and Safflower

Veggie Tips

Basil – To keep your basil fresh, store in a glass of water on the counter (NOT in the refrigerator) like you would flowers and cover with a bag. Change the water regularly. Or you can use it up all at once in a batch of pesto which can include carrot tops (like this recipe) or even zucchini! Other ideas: zucchini stir-fry (see the Recipe of the Week), potato salad, cabbage salad, zucchini salad, bean and zucchini salad, one pot zucchini pasta (with ricotta or mascarpone), with peaches and cheese, or hummus (just zucchini ormore traditional). Many more recipes on our website.

Cabbage – Cabbage is one of the most versatile vegetables around – see our website’s cabbage page for proof. It stores well too (refrigerated, in a bag). For really long storage, make sauerkraut! You can easily make a small batch in a mason jar.

Carrots – Separate the roots from the greens before storing them in the refrigerator to help them stay crunchy and crisp. If they do get a little limp, you can revive them by putting them in water, even for just five minutes. Give your carrot greens a try! We’ve heard from several of you that you like making carrot top pesto or salsa verde. They can also be used in a broth, chimichurri, or soup. Check out the other carrot recipes on our website.

New Potatoes – It is CRUCIAL that you keep new potatoes refrigerated, as you would any highly perishable produce. The skins are very thin and fragile and might get a little scuffed in the harvesting and washing process. Read more about how we grow and harvest potatoes here and for folks who want to know, see the photo that identifies the varieties that we’re growing this year. 

New potatoes have less starch and a higher water content than older potatoes so they’re very creamy and sweet, a real treat. They can be used as you would any “less-new” potato: steamed, sautéed, boiled, roasted, and grilled; this website has tips for any of those basic preparation methods. Dru’s favorite way to enjoy them is to steam or boil and then smash on her plate with a fork. We love them roasted too and in potato salad. They really don’t need much added to taste good. You can find some additional recipe suggestions here and on our website.

Onions – The onions are now dried and do not need to be refrigerated.

Peaches – These are mostly Spring Flame, though we’re also starting to harvest some Zee Pride. Both are yellow peaches. We pick them a bit firm to (hopefully) get them to you with minimal bruising, but even when ripe, they’ll still be on the firmer side. Peaches are best stored on the counter, stem side down. If you want to speed up ripening, put them in a paper bag. If you need to slow down ripening, move them to the refrigerator, though extended time in a refrigerator can negatively impact their texture. See our website for a few recipe ideas, and make sure to read the News from the Farm this week – all about peaches.

Summer Squash – Squash should be stored in the fridge (ideally in the crisper drawer), and in a bag. The key is moisture management; you want to make sure that they don’t dry, but they will spoil if there is too much condensation. You may want to move your squash to a plastic bag, but make sure one end of the bag is open for air circulation. Don’t wash your squash until you’re ready to use them. And when you are, see the Recipe of the Week and we’ve got lots of ideas on our website, this list and this one have a few more, and also: grilled with new potatoes, a savory Italian tart, roasted with potatoes or carrots (or both), pickled, roasted, with noodles or pasta, smashed with lime, eggs, or bake something sweet. You don’t have to cook squash; you can make slaw, soba noodles, grain salad, or simple carpaccio.

*Click on produce above for Recipes

Flower of the Week: Rudbeckia (Black-eyed Susans) and Safflower or Statice

Veggie Tips

Basil – To keep your basil fresh, store in a glass of water on the counter (NOT in the refrigerator) like you would flowers and cover with a bag. Change the water regularly. Or you can use it up all at once in a batch of pesto which can include carrot tops (like this recipe) or even zucchini! Other ideas: zucchini stir-fry (see the Recipe of the Week), potato salad, cabbage salad, zucchini salad, bean and zucchini salad, one pot zucchini pasta (with ricotta or mascarpone), with peaches and cheese, or hummus (just zucchini ormore traditional). Many more recipes on our website.

Cabbage – Cabbage is one of the most versatile vegetables around – see our website’s cabbage page for proof. It stores well too (refrigerated, in a bag). For really long storage, make sauerkraut! You can easily make a small batch in a mason jar.

Carrots – Separate the roots from the greens before storing them in the refrigerator to help them stay crunchy and crisp. If they do get a little limp, you can revive them by putting them in water, even for just five minutes. Give your carrot greens a try! We’ve heard from several of you that you like making carrot top pesto or salsa verde. They can also be used in a broth, chimichurri, or soup. Check out the other carrot recipes on our website.

New Potatoes – It is CRUCIAL that you keep new potatoes refrigerated, as you would any highly perishable produce. The skins are very thin and fragile and might get a little scuffed in the harvesting and washing process. Read more about how we grow and harvest potatoes here and for folks who want to know, see the photo that identifies the varieties that we’re growing this year. 

New potatoes have less starch and a higher water content than older potatoes so they’re very creamy and sweet, a real treat. They can be used as you would any “less-new” potato: steamed, sautéed, boiled, roasted, and grilled; this website has tips for any of those basic preparation methods. Dru’s favorite way to enjoy them is to steam or boil and then smash on her plate with a fork. We love them roasted too and in potato salad. They really don’t need much added to taste good. You can find some additional recipe suggestions here and on our website.

Onions – The onions are now dried and do not need to be refrigerated.

Peaches – These are mostly Spring Flame, though we’re also starting to harvest some Zee Pride. Both are yellow peaches. We pick them a bit firm to (hopefully) get them to you with minimal bruising, but even when ripe, they’ll still be on the firmer side. Peaches are best stored on the counter, stem side down. If you want to speed up ripening, put them in a paper bag. If you need to slow down ripening, move them to the refrigerator, though extended time in a refrigerator can negatively impact their texture. See our website for a few recipe ideas, and make sure to read the News from the Farm this week – all about peaches.

Summer Squash – Squash should be stored in the fridge (ideally in the crisper drawer), and in a bag. The key is moisture management; you want to make sure that they don’t dry, but they will spoil if there is too much condensation. You may want to move your squash to a plastic bag, but make sure one end of the bag is open for air circulation. Don’t wash your squash until you’re ready to use them. And when you are, see the Recipe of the Week and we’ve got lots of ideas on our website, this list and this one have a few more, and also: grilled with new potatoes, a savory Italian tart, roasted with potatoes or carrots (or both), pickled, roasted, with noodles or pasta, smashed with lime, eggs, or bake something sweet. You don’t have to cook squash; you can make slaw, soba noodles, grain salad, or simple carpaccio.

*Click on produce above for Recipes

Flower of the Week: Rudbeckia (Black-eyed Susans)

Veggie Tips

Apricots – We have several apricot varieties ripening at once! We’re currently harvesting Robada and Katy apricots; Robada have a deeper red blush. Store stem-side down on the counter (away from sunlight and heat) until slightly soft and aromatic, but they don’t need to be squishy to taste good. Once ripe, they can be moved to the refrigerator to avoid spoiling, but the cold can change the texture and taste.

Carrots – Separate the roots from the greens before storing them in the refrigerator to help them stay crunchy and crisp. If they do get a little limp, you can revive them by putting them in water, even for just five minutes. Give your carrot greens a try! We’ve heard from several of you that you like making carrot top pesto or salsa verde. They can also be used in a broth, chimichurri, or soup. Save one or two for the Recipe of the Week and check out the other carrot recipes on our website.

Garlic – The garlic is basically cured and dried. It can be stored on the counter and doesn’t need to be refrigerated.

Napa Cabbage – This spring napa cabbage may not have heads that are as tight and compact as our winter cabbage, they are still sweet with the perfect mix of crunchy and soft textures that makes it so good raw or cooked. You can use it in the place of “regular” cabbage, but it’s more delicate and has a higher water content (more like bok choi), so keep that in mind. It’s popular in stir-fries and slaws, and we have several ideas for both preparation styles on our website (plus other recipes too). And there are so many other options out there like the Recipe of the Week, stir-fries  with peanut sauce, zucchini, with rice noodles and zucchini or carrots and zucchini and slaws with peanut dressing, kale,  or other vegetables. Try roasting your cabbage, savory pancakes (okonomiyaki or baechujeon), or check out the recipes on this list. And you can always use it like a wrap, or make kimchi or quick a quick pickle (Japanese or Taiwanese)! It can stay for about two weeks if stored in a bag in the fridge. If you use your cabbage for multiple dishes, you can peel leaves off the outside or cut, but make sure to wrap it up well before returning to the fridge.

New Potatoes – It is CRUCIAL that you keep them refrigerated, as you would any highly perishable produce. The skins are very thin and fragile and might get a little scuffed in the harvesting and washing process. Read more about how we grow and harvest potatoes here and for folks who want to know, see the photo that identifies the varieties that we’re growing this year. 

New potatoes have less starch and a higher water content older potatoes so they’re very creamy and sweet, a real treat. They can be used as you would any “less-new” potato: steamed, sautéed, boiled, roasted, and grilled; this website has tips for any of those basic preparation methods. Dru’s favorite way to enjoy them is to steam or boil and then smash on her plate with a fork. We love them roasted too and in potato salad. They really don’t need much added to taste good. You can find some additional recipe suggestions here and on our website.

Parsley – It’s very easy to use up a whole bunch of parsley if you make sauce like chimmichurri (which would taste great with potatoes or squash), gremolata, or a pesto, herb oil, or another parsley-heavy dish. Other ideas: pasta, or even a parsley salad. But if you’re using it more slowly and are looking to keep it fresh for a longer period, you should keep it in the refrigerator in a plastic bag, a plastic bag wrapped in a damp paper towel, or in a glass of water (like a bunch of flowers, or basil) covered loosely with a plastic bag. Some ideas: try adding some to fried potatoes or a potato salad with vinaigrette or spices, or make a carrot salad). Additional recipe ideas on our website.

Summer Squash – Squash should be stored in the fridge (ideally in the crisper drawer), and in a bag (either the bag they come in or a plastic bag). The key is moisture management; you want to make sure that they don’t dry, but they will spoil if there is too much condensation. Especially if using a plastic bag, make sure one end of the bag is open for air circulation. Don’t wash your squash until you’re ready to use them. And when you are, see the Recipe of the Week and we’ve got lots of ideas on our website, this list has a few more, and also: grilled with new potatoes, a savory Italian tart, roasted with potatoes or carrots (or both), pickled, roasted, pasta, smashed with lime, eggs, or bake something. You don’t have to cook squash; you can make slaw, soba noodles, grain salad, or simple carpaccio.

*Click on produce above for Recipes

Flower of the Week: Rudbeckia (Black-eyed Susans)

Veggie Tips

Apricots – We have several apricot varieties ripening at once! We’re currently harvesting Robada and Katy apricots; Robada have a deeper red blush. Some of the fruit have a lightly scuffed skin, or healed over cracks, but both are purely cosmetic. Store stem-side down on the counter (away from sunlight and heat) until slightly soft and aromatic, but they don’t need to be squishy to taste good. Once ripe, they can be moved to the refrigerator to avoid spoiling, but the cold can change the texture and taste.

Cabbage – Cabbage is one of the most versatile vegetables around – see our website’s cabbage page for proof, plus there’s the Recipe of the Week. And it stores well too (refrigerated, in a bag). We love making slaw (we made a great sesame slaw for pizza night) and there are several salad and slaw recipes on the website. It’s also very easy to make sauerkraut! You can easily make a small batch in a mason jar.

Carrots – Separate the roots from the greens before storing them in the refrigerator to help them stay crunchy and crisp. If they do get a little limp, you can revive them by putting them in water, even for just five minutes. Give your carrot greens a try! We’ve heard from several of you that you like making carrot top pesto or salsa verde. They can also be used in a broth, chimichurri, or soup. Save one or two for the Recipe of the Week and check out the other carrot recipes on our website.

Garlic – The garlic is basically cured and dried. It can be stored on the counter and doesn’t need to be refrigerated.

New Potatoes – It is CRUCIAL that you keep them refrigerated, as you would any highly perishable produce. The skins are very thin and fragile and might get a little scuffed in the harvesting and washing process. Read more about how we grow and harvest potatoes here and for folks who want to know, see the photo that identifies the varieties that we’re growing this year. 

New potatoes have less starch and a higher water content older potatoes so they’re very creamy and sweet, a real treat. They can be used as you would any “less-new” potato: steamed, sautéed, boiled, roasted, and grilled; this website has tips for any of those basic preparation methods. Dru’s favorite way to enjoy them is to steam or boil and then smash on her plate with a fork. We love them roasted too and in potato salad. They really don’t need much added to taste good. You can find some additional recipe suggestions here and on our website.

Parsley – It’s very easy to use up a whole bunch of parsley if you make sauce like chimmichurri (which would taste great with potatoes or squash), gremolata, or a pesto, herb oil, or another parsley-heavy dish. Other ideas: pasta, or even a parsley salad. But if you’re using it more slowly and are looking to keep it fresh for a longer period, you should keep it in the refrigerator in a plastic bag, a plastic bag wrapped in a damp paper towel, or in a glass of water (like a bunch of flowers, or basil) covered loosely with a plastic bag. Some ideas: try adding some to fried potatoes or a potato salad with vinaigrette or spices, or make a carrot salad). Additional recipe ideas on our website.

Summer Squash – Squash should be stored in the fridge (ideally in the crisper drawer), and in a bag (either the bag they come in or a plastic bag). The key is moisture management; you want to make sure that they don’t dry, but they will spoil if there is too much condensation. Especially if using a plastic bag, make sure one end of the bag is open for air circulation. Don’t wash your squash until you’re ready to use them. And when you are, see the Recipe of the Week and we’ve got lots of ideas on our website, this list has a few more, and also: grilled with new potatoes, a savory Italian tart, roasted with potatoes or carrots (or both), pickled, roasted, pasta, smashed with lime, eggs, or bake something. You don’t have to cook squash; you can make slaw, soba noodles, grain salad, or simple carpaccio.

*Click on produce above for Recipes

Flower of the Week: Rudbeckia (Black-eyed Susans)

Veggie Tips

Apricots – We have several apricot varieties ripening at once! We’re currently harvesting Robada and Katy apricots; Robada have a deeper red blush. Some of the fruit have a lightly scuffed skin, or healed over cracks, but both are purely cosmetic. Store stem-side down on the counter (away from sunlight and heat) until slightly soft and aromatic, but they don’t need to be squishy to taste good. Once ripe, they can be moved to the refrigerator to avoid spoiling, but the cold can change the texture and taste.

Basil – To keep your basil fresh, store in a glass of water on the counter (NOT in the refrigerator) like you would flowers and cover with a plastic bag. Change the water regularly. Or you can use it up all at once in a batch of pesto which can include carrot tops (like this recipe) or even zucchini! Other ideas: potato salad, cabbage salad, zucchini salad, bean and zucchini salad, with apricots and ricotta, or hummus (zucchini dip or traditional with beans). Many more recipes on our website.

Cabbage – Cabbage is one of the most versatile vegetables around – see our website’s cabbage page for proof, plus there’s the Recipe of the Week. And it stores well too (refrigerated, in a bag). We love making slaw (we made a great sesame slaw for pizza night) and there are several salad and slaw recipes on the website. It’s also very easy to make sauerkraut! You can easily make a small batch in a mason jar.

Carrots – Separate the roots from the greens before storing them in the refrigerator to help them stay crunchy and crisp. If they do get a little limp, you can revive them by putting them in water, even for just five minutes. Give your carrot greens a try! We’ve heard from several of you that you like making carrot top pesto or salsa verde. They can also be used in a broth, chimichurri, or soup. Save one or two for the Recipe of the Week and check out the other carrot recipes on our website.

Garlic – The garlic is basically cured and dried. It can be stored on the counter and doesn’t need to be refrigerated.

New Potatoes – It is CRUCIAL that you keep them refrigerated, as you would any highly perishable produce. The skins are very thin and fragile and might get a little scuffed in the harvesting and washing process. Read more about how we grow and harvest potatoes here and for folks who want to know, see the photo that identifies the varieties that we’re growing this year. 

New potatoes have less starch and a higher water content older potatoes so they’re very creamy and sweet, a real treat. They can be used as you would any “less-new” potato: steamed, sautéed, boiled, roasted, and grilled; this website has tips for any of those basic preparation methods. Dru’s favorite way to enjoy them is to steam or boil and then smash on her plate with a fork. We love them roasted too and in potato salad. They really don’t need much added to taste good. You can find some additional recipe suggestions here and on our website.

Summer Squash – Squash should be stored in the fridge (ideally in the crisper drawer), and in a bag (either the bag they come in or a plastic bag). The key is moisture management; you want to make sure that they don’t dry, but they will spoil if there is too much condensation. Especially if using a plastic bag, make sure one end of the bag is open for air circulation. Don’t wash your squash until you’re ready to use them. And when you are, see the Recipe of the Week and we’ve got lots of ideas on our website, this list and this one have a few more, and also: grilled with new potatoes, a savory Italian tart, roasted with potatoes or carrots (or both), pickled, roasted, pasta, smashed with lime, eggs, or bake something. You don’t have to cook squash; you can make slaw, soba noodles, grain salad, or simple carpaccio.

*Click on produce above for Recipes

Flower of the Week: Rudbeckia (Black-eyed Susans)

Veggie Tips

Basil – To keep your basil fresh, store in a glass of water on the counter (NOT in the refrigerator) like you would flowers and cover with a plastic bag. Change the water regularly. Or you can use it up all at once in a batch of pesto which can include carrot tops (like this recipe) or even zucchini! Other ideas: zucchini stir-fry, potato salad, cabbage salad, zucchini salad, bean and zucchini salad, pasta, with peaches and cheese, or hummus (zucchini dip or traditional with beans). Many more recipes on our website.

Cabbage – Cabbage is one of the most versatile vegetables around – see our website’s cabbage page for proof, plus there’s the Recipe of the Week. And it stores well too (refrigerated, in a bag). We love making slaw (we made a great sesame slaw for pizza night) and there are several salad and slaw recipes on the website. It’s also very easy to make sauerkraut! You can easily make a small batch in a mason jar.

Carrots – Separate the roots from the greens before storing them in the refrigerator to help them stay crunchy and crisp. If they do get a little limp, you can revive them by putting them in water, even for just five minutes. Give your carrot greens a try! We’ve heard from several of you that you like making carrot top pesto or salsa verde. They can also be used in a broth, chimichurri, or soup. Save one or two for the Recipe of the Week and check out the other carrot recipes on our website.

Garlic – The garlic is basically cured and dried. It can be stored on the counter and doesn’t need to be refrigerated.

Mandarin Oranges – A couple of mandarins from our friends and neighbors at Gold Oak Ranch. They may be stored in a cool, dark spot for a few days, or even on your counter but ideally should be refrigerated to extend shelf life up to two weeks. These are probably the last ones of the year!

New Potatoes – It is CRUCIAL that you keep them refrigerated, as you would any highly perishable produce. The skins are very thin and fragile and might get a little scuffed in the harvesting and washing process. Read more about how we grow and harvest potatoes here and for folks who want to know, see the photo that identifies the varieties that we’re growing this year. 

New potatoes have less starch and a higher water content older potatoes so they’re very creamy and sweet, a real treat. They can be used as you would any “less-new” potato: steamed, sautéed, boiled, roasted, and grilled; this website has tips for any of those basic preparation methods. Dru’s favorite way to enjoy them is to steam or boil and then smash on her plate with a fork. We love them roasted too and in potato salad. They really don’t need much added to taste good. You can find some additional recipe suggestions here and on our website.

Peaches – These are Queencrest or Springcrest peaches, two early yellow varieties. We pick them a bit firm to (hopefully) get them to you with minimal bruising, but even when ripe, they’ll still be on the firmer side. Peaches are best stored on the counter, stem side down. If you want to speed up ripening, put them in a paper bag. If you need to slow down ripening, move them to the refrigerator, though extended time in a refrigerator can negatively impact their texture.

Summer Squash – Squash should be stored in the fridge (ideally in the crisper drawer), and in a bag (either the bag they come in or a plastic bag). The key is moisture management; you want to make sure that they don’t dry, but they will spoil if there is too much condensation. Especially if using a plastic bag, make sure one end of the bag is open for air circulation. Don’t wash your squash until you’re ready to use them. And when you are, see the Recipe of the Week and we’ve got lots of ideas on our website, this list and this one have a few more, and also: grilled with new potatoes, a savory Italian tart, roasted with potatoes or carrots (or both), pickled, roasted, pasta, smashed with lime, eggs, or bake something. You don’t have to cook squash; you can make slaw, soba noodles, grain salad, or simple carpaccio.

*Click on produce above for Recipes

Flower of the Week: Rudbeckia (Black-eyed Susans)

Veggie Tips

Basil – To keep your basil fresh, store in a glass of water on the counter (NOT in the refrigerator) like you would flowers and cover with a plastic bag. Change the water regularly. Or you can use it up all at once in a batch of pesto which can include carrot tops (like this recipe) or even zucchini! Other ideas: zucchini stir-fry, potato salad, cabbage salad, zucchini salad, bean and zucchini salad, pasta, with peaches and cheese, or hummus (zucchini dip or traditional with beans). Many more recipes on our website.

Cabbage – Cabbage is one of the most versatile vegetables around – see our website’s cabbage page for proof, plus there’s the Recipe of the Week. And it stores well too (refrigerated, in a bag). We love making slaw (we made a great sesame slaw for pizza night) and there are several salad and slaw recipes on the website. It’s also very easy to make sauerkraut! You can easily make a small batch in a mason jar.

Carrots – Separate the roots from the greens before storing them in the refrigerator to help them stay crunchy and crisp. If they do get a little limp, you can revive them by putting them in water, even for just five minutes. Give your carrot greens a try! We’ve heard from several of you that you like making carrot top pesto or salsa verde. They can also be used in a broth, chimichurri, or soup. Save one or two for the Recipe of the Week and check out the other carrot recipes on our website.

Garlic – The garlic is basically cured and dried. It can be stored on the counter and doesn’t need to be refrigerated.

Mandarin Oranges – A couple of mandarins from our friends and neighbors at Gold Oak Ranch. They may be stored in a cool, dark spot for a few days, or even on your counter but ideally should be refrigerated to extend shelf life up to two weeks. These are probably the last ones of the year!

New Potatoes – It is CRUCIAL that you keep them refrigerated, as you would any highly perishable produce. The skins are very thin and fragile and might get a little scuffed in the harvesting and washing process. Read more about how we grow and harvest potatoes here and for folks who want to know, see the photo that identifies the varieties that we’re growing this year. 

New potatoes have less starch and a higher water content older potatoes so they’re very creamy and sweet, a real treat. They can be used as you would any “less-new” potato: steamed, sautéed, boiled, roasted, and grilled; this website has tips for any of those basic preparation methods. Dru’s favorite way to enjoy them is to steam or boil and then smash on her plate with a fork. We love them roasted too and in potato salad. They really don’t need much added to taste good. You can find some additional recipe suggestions here and on our website.

Peaches – These are Queencrest or Springcrest peaches, two early yellow varieties. We pick them a bit firm to (hopefully) get them to you with minimal bruising, but even when ripe, they’ll still be on the firmer side. Peaches are best stored on the counter, stem side down. If you want to speed up ripening, put them in a paper bag. If you need to slow down ripening, move them to the refrigerator, though extended time in a refrigerator can negatively impact their texture.

Summer Squash – Squash should be stored in the fridge (ideally in the crisper drawer), and in a bag (either the bag they come in or a plastic bag). The key is moisture management; you want to make sure that they don’t dry, but they will spoil if there is too much condensation. Especially if using a plastic bag, make sure one end of the bag is open for air circulation. Don’t wash your squash until you’re ready to use them. And when you are, see the Recipe of the Week and we’ve got lots of ideas on our website, this list and this one have a few more, and also: grilled with new potatoes, a savory Italian tart, roasted with potatoes or carrots (or both), pickled, roasted, pasta, smashed with lime, eggs, or bake something. You don’t have to cook squash; you can make slaw, soba noodles, grain salad, or simple carpaccio.