What’s in my box this week?

Click on your delivery date to see what is in your box this week. Note that the web site is updated daily to reflect the NEXT day’s deliveries but before that, will show the information from the previous week. You can check an earlier day in the week to get an idea of what will be in your box, but the contents of your box may be different as the box contents frequently change between days.

*Click on produce above for Recipes

Veggie Tips

Beets – We grow gold, red, and Chioggia (candy stripe) beets. All have a sweet, earthy taste. Right now the greens are looking amazing so dont discard them; theyre very similar to chard, maybe a little heartier. They can be sautéed (try Sicilian style with raisins and pine nuts), added to soup, pickled, made into a pesto, or add them to a gratin with green garlic (available here if you don’t have NY Times access), pasta, omelets/frittatas, and more. Cook them with the roots in a soup or a barley risotto. You can also mix with carrot greens in a soup or salad. The roots are infinitely adaptable (so many recipe ideas on our website) and can be cooked several ways. This list and this list provide rundowns on the various ways to prepare them. Roasting takes the longest but will yield the most flavorful and sweetest results. Roasted beets can be added to anything, including your breakfast yogurt and granola, sandwiches, hummus, pasta, green salads, and grain salads (with oranges too). Or make beet chips! Separate the roots from the greens when you get home and store both in bags. 

Butternut Squash – Butternut squash is so versatile (so many recipe ideas on this list or this list). You can eat it with every meal, and it can be even eaten pickled or raw! You can freeze cubed butternut or make puree, to use for soup, baked goods (use instead of pumpkin in pie, muffins, or breads), or really anything. To make puree, a CSA member recommended roasting the squash whole and then removing the skin and seeds after roasting. Butternut also is excellent roasted in cubes or chunks which you can add to soup (really good with beans and greens), pasta, or make a salad. See the Recipe of the Week. It goes well mixed with other produce, especially root vegetables. There are many excellent squash recipes on our website. Store in a cool, dry place until ready to use, but it’s near the end of squash season and it may not have a very long shelf life. Make sure to inspect for cuts and gashes that can lead to rot. Cut squash can be stored in the fridge, ideally left whole but also in cubes, for several days. More storage tips here.

Carrots – separate the roots from the greens before storing them in the refrigerator to help them stay crunchy and crisp. If they do get a little limp, you can revive them by putting them in water, even for just five minutes. Carrots make an excellent snack or check out the recipes on our website for other ideas. We’ve heard from several CSA members that they’ve made a delicious carrot cake. You can also make cake or muffins with a mix of carrots and beets or butternut too. What’s your favorite recipe? Give your carrot greens a try! They can be used in a broth, pesto (which you can enjoy with the roots) chimichurri, or soup.

Cauliflower – We are so excited to have more cauliflower for you! You’ll get a white or purple cauliflower. Cauliflower is so versatile; it can be roasted, raw (make a salad with mandarins!), blanched, pickled, steamed, sautéed. Roasting brings out its sweet side; see the Recipe of the Week, enjoy plain, add it to pasta, a salad, or mix with other vegetables, like carrots, butternut, or beets. You can also make a soup – a blended, creamy soup (with butternut) or something more chunky (like with carrots, kale, a curry with squash, or minestrone). A CSA member recommended this “rice” pilaf recipe. What are your favorite ways to eat cauliflower? You should use the leaves and stems too. Stems will require longer cooking times and leaves will require less. Tip for the leaves: massage them with oil and add them to a baking pan for roasting; bake until they are crisp or sauté the leaves like kale, or add to whatever treatment the florets receive). We have two great recipes on our website and some of our other favorite sites have a plethora of tasty and delicious ideas – see here or here for more ideas. Store in the refrigerator in a bag, loosely covered with some airflow.

Green Garlic – It’s green garlic time! In fall we plant cloves (a combination of purchased seed garlic and our own saved garlic) and green garlic is just the immature form of garlic. Between now and June, they’ll form cloves and will bulb out at the bottom, but for now, they look more like little leeks. Green garlic should be kept in the refrigerator in a bag. Much like leeks, you can use the whole stalk, though some folks may find the upper green parts too tough. Save those for making broth or stock. It has a fresh, mild flavor and can be used raw or cooked. You can add green garlic to any dish you would make with cured garlic (one stalk is about equal to one large clove) or you can make something with more delicate flavors to highlight the taste of green garlic like pasta, pasta with lime, risotto, crostini with goat cheese, toast, hummus, beets, beets and greens, salad dressing, and raita being a few examples. Green garlic is excellent added to eggs or any potato dish, like mashed potatoes or soup. Green garlic can even be made into a pesto. More about green garlic here. 

Mandarin Oranges – These are Gold Nugget mandarins from our friends and neighbors at Gold Oak Ranch. They may be stored in a cool, dark spot for a few days, or even on your counter but ideally should be refrigerated to extend shelf life up to two weeks.

Red Russian Kale – A soft, tender kale with a sweet taste, perfect for any and all kale dishes. Lots of kale ideas on our website, including this soup with leeks, pasta with leeks, and polenta. Make a salad with apples and cheese or quinoa, sauté, or add to soup. Don’t discard the sweet and beautiful purple/red stems! You can add them a little earlier in the cooking process, or save them for something different, like pickles. Try this recipe for Japanese-style pickles. Store in the refrigerator in a bag.

*Click on produce above for Recipes

Veggie Tips

Carrots – separate the roots from the greens before storing them in the refrigerator to help them stay crunchy and crisp. If they do get a little limp, you can revive them by putting them in water, even for just five minutes. Carrots make an excellent snack or check out the recipes on our website for other ideas. Give your carrot greens a try! They can be used in a broth, pesto (which you can enjoy with the roots) chimichurri, or soup. 

Chard – Chard, like most hearty greens, is incredibly versatile. Chard makes a good pair with potatoes, and is excellent sautéed on its own or blanched. Some people like eating it raw too – like in a slaw.  It’s perfect for soups and stews and other hearty fare, like curried lentils or a gratin. Make sure not to discard the stems, as some recipes will tell you to do, they’re the most flavorful part of the plant, and it has a great texture. You can make something separate with the stems, like pickles or lentil soup, or just chop into small pieces and add a little sooner to your dish when cooking. Store in the refrigerator in a bag. We’ve got several good recipes on our website, and you can swap out chard for any recipe that calls for kale, beet greens, or even spinach (just cook it longer) or collards (just cook it less). Additional ideas here and here.

Leeks – False alarm last week when we said it was the last week of leeks. This is the last week. Be sure to rinse well, or put cut leeks in a bowl of water to remove the dirt and grit that can get stuck between the leaves (more cutting and cooking advice here). People often don’t cook with the tougher green tops but don’t discard. You can roast, braise, save for veggie stock or make leek oil to drizzle over soups, stews, bread, or roasted veggies! One of our site host roasts his to make leek chips (like kale chips). He said “I bake my leek tops at 275˚F, as you do with kale chips. I’ve experimented with a few different ‘dressings’, like you might do with kale chips. They were all good! My blends included olive oil and salt with:

– lemon juice, turmeric, garlic powder

– garlic powder & smoked paprika

– tamari, nutritional yeast”

Store leeks in the refrigerator, wrapped in a bag to retain moisture (and to prevent your refrigerator from smelling like leeks) where they’ll last for two weeks or so. See the many great ideas on our website. 

Mandarin Oranges – These are Gold Nugget mandarins from our friends and neighbors at Gold Oak Ranch. They may be stored in a cool, dark spot for a few days, or even on your counter but ideally should be refrigerated to extend shelf life up to two weeks.

Potatoes – We’re currently harvesting Bintje (white) and Bella Roja (red). Store in the refrigerator and out of the light (we recommend a paper bag). We’ve got several recipe ideas on our website.

Romanesco or Cauliflower – Most folks will be getting a white or lavender cauliflower this week, though you also might get a green romanesco. Romanesco is so similar to cauliflower that you should treat it the same! Cauliflower is so versatile; it can be roasted, raw, blanched, pickled, steamed, sautéed. Roasting cauliflower and romanesco brings out their sweet side; add it to pasta or mix with other vegetables, like carrots.You can also make a soup – a blended, creamy soup or something more chunky (like with carrots or chard, if you’ve got a rutabaga hanging around, try this one). You should use the leaves and stems too. Stems will require longer cooking times and leaves will require less. Tip for the leaves: massage them with oil and add them to a baking pan for roasting; bake until they are crisp or sauté the leaves like kale, or add to whatever treatment the florets receive). We have two great recipes on our website and some of our other favorite sites have a plethora of tasty and delicious ideas – see here or here for more ideas. Store in the refrigerator in a bag, loosely covered with some airflow.

White Daikon – Don’t be intimidated by daikon. It’s a member of the radish family and you can use it anywhere you’d use its smaller cousins (“regular” radishes, or watermelon daikon). They can grow to be quite large and are difficult to get out of the ground whole, especially in soils that contain more clay, like ours, so you might get a root that’s missing the bottom. Daikon is the white part of the pickle included in a bahn mi sandwich, the main component in the popular dim sum dish lo bak go (here’s one of many recipes), kkakdugi (daikon-only kimchi), and the yellow takuan Japanese pickled radish (quick pickled or fermented). You can also add it to kraut (with beets too) or make It commonly appears in Japanese (ideas here), Korean (salad or pancakes) and Indian cooking (like the Recipe of the Week or this stir-fry sub chard for kale). It goes well in miso soup, charred, boiled, stir-fried,  braised with miso or orange juice, raw in a salad (grated plain or thinly sliced and added to greens), mashed, quick-pickled, or roasted (as “fries”, cubes, or wedges). Combine daikon with potatoes (soup, gratin, fritters) or substitute daikon for potatoes. Additional ideas here, here, or here, or on our website.

*Click on produce above for Recipes

Veggie Tips

Carrots – separate the roots from the greens before storing them in the refrigerator to help them stay crunchy and crisp. If they do get a little limp, you can revive them by putting them in water, even for just five minutes. Carrots make an excellent snack or check out the recipes on our website for other ideas. Give your carrot greens a try! They can be used in a broth, pesto (which you can enjoy with the roots) chimichurri, or soup. 

Chard – Chard, like most hearty greens, is incredibly versatile. Chard makes a good pair with potatoes, and is excellent sautéed on its own or blanched. Some people like eating it raw too – like in a slaw.  It’s perfect for soups and stews and other hearty fare, like curried lentils or a gratin. Make sure not to discard the stems, as some recipes will tell you to do, they’re the most flavorful part of the plant, and it has a great texture. You can make something separate with the stems, like pickles or lentil soup, or just chop into small pieces and add a little sooner to your dish when cooking. Store in the refrigerator in a bag. We’ve got several good recipes on our website, and you can swap out chard for any recipe that calls for kale, beet greens, or even spinach (just cook it longer) or collards (just cook it less). Additional ideas here and here.

Green Garlic – It’s green garlic time! in fall we plant cloves (a combination of purchased seed garlic and our own saved garlic) and green garlic is just the immature form of garlic. Between now and June, they’ll form cloves and will bulb out at the bottom, but for now, they look more like little leeks. Green garlic should be kept in the refrigerator in a bag. Much like leeks, you can use the whole stalk, though some folks may find the upper green parts too tough. Save those for making broth or stock. It has a fresh, mild flavor and can be used raw or cooked. You can add green garlic to any dish you would make with cured garlic (one stalk is about equal to one large clove) or you can make something with more delicate flavors to highlight the taste of green garlic like curry, pasta, pasta with lime, risotto, crostini with goat cheese, toast, hummus, salad dressing, and raita being a few examples. Green garlic is excellent added to any eggs or any potato dish, like mashed potatoes, roasted, or soup. Green garlic can even be made into a pesto. More about green garlic here and we’ve got several excellent recipes on our website.

Mandarin Oranges – These are Gold Nugget mandarins from our friends and neighbors at Gold Oak Ranch. They may be stored in a cool, dark spot for a few days, or even on your counter but ideally should be refrigerated to extend shelf life up to two weeks.

Potatoes – We’re currently harvesting Bintje (white) and Bella Roja (red). Store in the refrigerator and out of the light (we recommend a paper bag). We’ve got several recipe ideas on our website.

Romanesco or Cauliflower – Most folks will be getting a white or lavender cauliflower this week, though you also might get a green romanesco. Romanesco is so similar to cauliflower that you should treat it the same! Cauliflower is so versatile; it can be roasted, raw, blanched, pickled, steamed, sautéed. Roasting cauliflower and romanesco brings out their sweet side; add it to pasta or mix with other vegetables, like carrots.You can also make a soup – a blended, creamy soup or something more chunky (like with carrots or chard, if you’ve got a rutabaga hanging around, try this one). You should use the leaves and stems too. Stems will require longer cooking times and leaves will require less. Tip for the leaves: massage them with oil and add them to a baking pan for roasting; bake until they are crisp or sauté the leaves like kale, or add to whatever treatment the florets receive). We have two great recipes on our website and some of our other favorite sites have a plethora of tasty and delicious ideas – see here or here for more ideas. Store in the refrigerator in a bag, loosely covered with some airflow.

White Daikon – Don’t be intimidated by daikon. It’s a member of the radish family and you can use it anywhere you’d use its smaller cousins (“regular” radishes, or watermelon daikon). They can grow to be quite large and are difficult to get out of the ground whole, especially in soils that contain more clay, like ours, so you might get a root that’s missing the bottom. Daikon is the white part of the pickle included in a bahn mi sandwich, the main component in the popular dim sum dish lo bak go (here’s one of many recipes), kkakdugi (daikon-only kimchi), and the yellow takuan Japanese pickled radish (quick pickled or fermented). You can also add it to kraut (with beets too) or make It commonly appears in Japanese (ideas here), Korean (salad or pancakes) and Indian cooking (like the Recipe of the Week or this stir-fry sub chard for kale). It goes well in miso soup, charred, boiled, stir-fried,  braised with miso or orange juice, raw in a salad (grated plain or thinly sliced and added to greens), mashed, quick-pickled, or roasted (as “fries”, cubes, or wedges). Combine daikon with potatoes (soup, gratin, fritters) or substitute daikon for potatoes. Additional ideas here, here, or here, or on our website.

*Click on produce above for Recipes

Veggie Tips

Carrots – separate the roots from the greens before storing them in the refrigerator to help them stay crunchy and crisp. If they do get a little limp, you can revive them by putting them in water, even for just five minutes. Carrots make an excellent snack or check out the recipes on our website for other ideas. Give your carrot greens a try! They can be used in a broth, pesto (which you can enjoy with the roots) chimichurri, or soup. 

Chard – Chard, like most hearty greens, is incredibly versatile. Chard makes a good pair with potatoes, and is excellent sautéed on its own or blanched. Some people like eating it raw too – like in a slaw.  It’s perfect for soups and stews and other hearty fare, like curried lentils or a gratin. Make sure not to discard the stems, as some recipes will tell you to do, they’re the most flavorful part of the plant, and it has a great texture. You can make something separate with the stems, like pickles or lentil soup, or just chop into small pieces and add a little sooner to your dish when cooking. Store in the refrigerator in a bag. We’ve got several good recipes on our website, and you can swap out chard for any recipe that calls for kale, beet greens, or even spinach (just cook it longer) or collards (just cook it less). Additional ideas here and here.

Green Garlic – It’s green garlic time! in fall we plant cloves (a combination of purchased seed garlic and our own saved garlic) and green garlic is just the immature form of garlic. Between now and June, they’ll form cloves and will bulb out at the bottom, but for now, they look more like little leeks. Green garlic should be kept in the refrigerator in a bag. Much like leeks, you can use the whole stalk, though some folks may find the upper green parts too tough. Save those for making broth or stock. It has a fresh, mild flavor and can be used raw or cooked. You can add green garlic to any dish you would make with cured garlic (one stalk is about equal to one large clove) or you can make something with more delicate flavors to highlight the taste of green garlic like curry, pasta, pasta with lime, risotto, crostini with goat cheese, toast, hummus, salad dressing, and raita being a few examples. Green garlic is excellent added to any eggs or any potato dish, like mashed potatoes, roasted, or soup. Green garlic can even be made into a pesto. More about green garlic here and we’ve got several excellent recipes on our website.

Mandarin Oranges – These are Gold Nugget mandarins from our friends and neighbors at Gold Oak Ranch. They may be stored in a cool, dark spot for a few days, or even on your counter but ideally should be refrigerated to extend shelf life up to two weeks.

Potatoes – We’re currently harvesting Bintje (white) and Bella Roja (red). Store in the refrigerator and out of the light (we recommend a paper bag). We’ve got several recipe ideas on our website.

Romanesco or Cauliflower – Most folks will be getting a white or lavender cauliflower this week, though you also might get a green romanesco. Romanesco is so similar to cauliflower that you should treat it the same! Cauliflower is so versatile; it can be roasted, raw, blanched, pickled, steamed, sautéed. Roasting cauliflower and romanesco brings out their sweet side; add it to pasta or mix with other vegetables, like carrots.You can also make a soup – a blended, creamy soup or something more chunky (like with carrots or chard, if you’ve got a rutabaga hanging around, try this one). You should use the leaves and stems too. Stems will require longer cooking times and leaves will require less. Tip for the leaves: massage them with oil and add them to a baking pan for roasting; bake until they are crisp or sauté the leaves like kale, or add to whatever treatment the florets receive). We have two great recipes on our website and some of our other favorite sites have a plethora of tasty and delicious ideas – see here or here for more ideas. Store in the refrigerator in a bag, loosely covered with some airflow.

White Daikon – Don’t be intimidated by daikon. It’s a member of the radish family and you can use it anywhere you’d use its smaller cousins (“regular” radishes, or watermelon daikon). They can grow to be quite large and are difficult to get out of the ground whole, especially in soils that contain more clay, like ours, so you might get a root that’s missing the bottom. Daikon is the white part of the pickle included in a bahn mi sandwich, the main component in the popular dim sum dish lo bak go (here’s one of many recipes), kkakdugi (daikon-only kimchi), and the yellow takuan Japanese pickled radish (quick pickled or fermented). You can also add it to kraut (with beets too) or make It commonly appears in Japanese (ideas here), Korean (salad or pancakes) and Indian cooking (like the Recipe of the Week or this stir-fry sub chard for kale). It goes well in miso soup, charred, boiled, stir-fried,  braised with miso or orange juice, raw in a salad (grated plain or thinly sliced and added to greens), mashed, quick-pickled, or roasted (as “fries”, cubes, or wedges). Combine daikon with potatoes (soup, gratin, fritters) or substitute daikon for potatoes. Additional ideas here, here, or here, or on our website.

*Click on produce above for Recipes

Veggie Tips

Carrots – separate the roots from the greens before storing them in the refrigerator to help them stay crunchy and crisp. If they do get a little limp, you can revive them by putting them in water, even for just five minutes. Carrots make an excellent snack or check out the recipes on our website for other ideas. Give your carrot greens a try! They can be used in a broth, pesto (which you can enjoy with the roots) chimichurri, or soup. 

Chard – Chard, like most hearty greens, is incredibly versatile. Chard makes a good pair with potatoes, and is excellent sautéed on its own or blanched. Some people like eating it raw too – like in a slaw.  It’s perfect for soups and stews and other hearty fare, like curried lentils or a gratin. Make sure not to discard the stems, as some recipes will tell you to do, they’re the most flavorful part of the plant, and it has a great texture. You can make something separate with the stems, like pickles or lentil soup, or just chop into small pieces and add a little sooner to your dish when cooking. Store in the refrigerator in a bag. We’ve got several good recipes on our website, and you can swap out chard for any recipe that calls for kale, beet greens, or even spinach (just cook it longer) or collards (just cook it less). Additional ideas here and here.

Green Garlic – It’s green garlic time! in fall we plant cloves (a combination of purchased seed garlic and our own saved garlic) and green garlic is just the immature form of garlic. Between now and June, they’ll form cloves and will bulb out at the bottom, but for now, they look more like little leeks. Green garlic should be kept in the refrigerator in a bag. Much like leeks, you can use the whole stalk, though some folks may find the upper green parts too tough. Save those for making broth or stock. It has a fresh, mild flavor and can be used raw or cooked. You can add green garlic to any dish you would make with cured garlic (one stalk is about equal to one large clove) or you can make something with more delicate flavors to highlight the taste of green garlic like curry, pasta, pasta with lime, risotto, crostini with goat cheese, toast, hummus, salad dressing, and raita being a few examples. Green garlic is excellent added to any eggs or any potato dish, like mashed potatoes, roasted, or soup. Green garlic can even be made into a pesto. More about green garlic here and we’ve got several excellent recipes on our website.

Mandarin Oranges – These are Gold Nugget mandarins from our friends and neighbors at Gold Oak Ranch. They may be stored in a cool, dark spot for a few days, or even on your counter but ideally should be refrigerated to extend shelf life up to two weeks.

Potatoes – We’re currently harvesting Bintje (white) and Bella Roja (red). Store in the refrigerator and out of the light (we recommend a paper bag). We’ve got several recipe ideas on our website.

Romanesco or Cauliflower – Most folks will be getting a white or lavender cauliflower this week, though you also might get a green romanesco. Romanesco is so similar to cauliflower that you should treat it the same! Cauliflower is so versatile; it can be roasted, raw, blanched, pickled, steamed, sautéed. Roasting cauliflower and romanesco brings out their sweet side; add it to pasta or mix with other vegetables, like carrots.You can also make a soup – a blended, creamy soup or something more chunky (like with carrots or chard, if you’ve got a rutabaga hanging around, try this one). You should use the leaves and stems too. Stems will require longer cooking times and leaves will require less. Tip for the leaves: massage them with oil and add them to a baking pan for roasting; bake until they are crisp or sauté the leaves like kale, or add to whatever treatment the florets receive). We have two great recipes on our website and some of our other favorite sites have a plethora of tasty and delicious ideas – see here or here for more ideas. Store in the refrigerator in a bag, loosely covered with some airflow.

White Daikon or Watermelon Daikon – Almost everyone will be getting a white daikon, but we’re a bit short on one for everyone, so some folks will be getting watermelon daikon! See below for notes on both. You can make the Recipe of the Week with either type!

White Daikon – Don’t be intimidated by daikon. It’s a member of the radish family and you can use it anywhere you’d use its smaller cousins (“regular” radishes, or watermelon daikon). They can grow to be quite large and are difficult to get out of the ground whole, especially in soils that contain more clay, like ours, so you might get a root that’s missing the bottom. Daikon is the white part of the pickle included in a bahn mi sandwich, the main component in the popular dim sum dish lo bak go (here’s one of many recipes), kkakdugi (daikon-only kimchi), and the yellow takuan Japanese pickled radish (quick pickled or fermented). You can also add it to kraut (with beets too) or make It commonly appears in Japanese (ideas here), Korean (salad or pancakes) and Indian cooking (like the Recipe of the Week or this stir-fry sub chard for kale). It goes well in miso soup, charred, boiled, stir-fried,  braised with miso or orange juice, raw in a salad (grated plain or thinly sliced and added to greens), mashed, quick-pickled, or roasted (as “fries”, cubes, or wedges). Combine daikon with potatoes (soup, gratin, fritters) or substitute daikon for potatoes. Additional ideas here, here, or here, or on our website.

Watermelon Daikon – You’ll understand why they’re called watermelon daikon when you slice into these beautiful radishes – they’re green on the outside and pink on the inside. They are not only beautiful but delicious and versatile. Ours are a bit larger than the average, which gives you more radish to cook with! They can be enjoyed raw: thinly shaved or in matchsticks and to make a salad (just radish, with lettuce, oranges, carrots, carrots and greens, or apples), grain salad, crostini. Or cut in wedges or thick slices like a chip for dipping. They make great quick pickles or can be made into fermented pickles, like with carrots or even kimchi. They’re not spicy but they get even sweeter when cooked, especially roasted (wedges, diced, or chips), steamed, blanched (try with noodles), stir-fried, sautéed, boiled in soup or to make this tofu dish. Watermelon radish also make an excellent addition to a tray of mixed roasted vegetables (try carrots or potatoes). Additional ideas here or on our website.