What’s in my box this week?

Click on your delivery date to see what is in your box this week. Note that the web site is updated daily to reflect the NEXT day’s deliveries but before that, will show the information from the previous week. You can check an earlier day in the week to get an idea of what will be in your box, but the contents of your box may be different as the box contents frequently change between days.

*Click on produce above for Recipes

Veggie Tips

Beets - We grow gold, red, and Chioggia (candy stripe) beets. All have a sweet, earthy taste, though gold and Chioggia are a tad sweeter and Chioggia are a little milder (and wont stain!). Right now the greens are looking amazing so don’t discard them; they’re very similar to chard, maybe a little heartier. They can be sautéed (try Sicilian style with raisins and pine nuts), added to soup, pickled, made into a pesto, or add them to pasta, omelettes/frittatas, and more. You can also mix with carrot greens in a soup or salad. The roots are infinitely adaptable (so many recipe ideas on our website) and can be cooked several ways. This list and this list provide rundowns on the various ways to prepare them. Roasting takes the longest but will yield the most flavorful and sweetest results. Roasted beets can be added to anything, including sandwiches, green salads, and grain salads (with oranges too). Separate the roots from the greens when you get home and store in bags.

Cabbage - Cabbage is one of the most versatile vegetables around - good for cooking (including roasting: plain, with potatoes, with a sauce and beans, or with noodles), eating raw, or fermenting (it makes excellent sauerkraut). It makes a great stir fry. See the Recipe of the Week for another idea, and you can also head over to our websites cabbage page for some great ideas. One classic combination with several of your box components is borscht, which is infinitely adaptable, cabbage and beets being two key components. If you’re looking for a good pairing with last week’s butternut, consider a soup: like this one with black-eyed peas or this one from the NY Times with butternut squash (use this link if the paywall stops you from viewing).

Carrots - Separate the root from the greens before storing them in the refrigerator, both in bags. Carrot tops are considered an acquired taste by some, but we encourage you to give them a try. We have many recipes on our website, but you can’t beat eating them plain.

Mandarin Oranges - These are tango mandarins from our friends and neighbors at Gold Oak Ranch. They may be stored in a cool, dark spot for a few days, or even on your counter but ideally should be refrigerated to extend shelf life up to two weeks.

Potatoes - Bintje potatoes (white) or La Soda (red). We recommend storing them in the refrigerator.

Red Russian Kale - A soft, tender kale with a sweet taste, perfect for any and all kale dishes. Don’t discard the beautiful purple/red stems! Lots of kale ideas on our website. Store in the refrigerator in a bag.

Spinach - So many good uses for spinach, raw or cooked. Make some soup with potatoes! More recipe ideas on our website, or this page has many great ideas. Store in the refrigerator. If not eating within two days or so, put a plastic bag around the paper bag you get it in. 

*Click on produce above for Recipes

Veggie Tips

Broccoli Rabe - Also spelled “raab,” it’s part of the turnip family and tastes like turnip greens, not like broccoli. For cooking, you can make a dish that's raab-specific or you can substitute it for most other leafy greens, especially the more tender greens, like chard or mustard greens. It can be a bit more on the bitter and earthy side, it’s often recommended that you first blanch and then sauté, but blanching isn’t necessary and you can skip that step and just sauté. Additional recipe ideas: with soba noodles and peanut sauce or soba and tahini, sautéed with sesame, with butternut squash, white beans, or pasta and butternut (with beans or mushrooms). Lots more ideas on this page and we have several ideas on our website. Store in the refrigerator in a bag.

Butternut Squash - Butternut squash is so versatile (so many recipe ideas on this list or this list). You can eat it with every meal, even breakfast (sweet or savory) and dessert, and it can be even eaten raw! Consider cutting up (try microwaving it to make it easier to peel) and roasting, solo or mixed with root vegetables like rutabaga and carrots (or beets if you still have some around). There are many excellent squash recipes on our website. Store in a cool, dry place until ready to use. Cut squash can be stored in the fridge, ideally left whole, but it also works to store cubes for several days. More storage tips here. 

Carrots - We grow super sweet Nantes carrots. More information about our carrots and how we grow and harvest them here. Separate the root from the greens before storing them in the refrigerator, both in bags. Carrot tops are considered an acquired taste by some, but we encourage you to give them a try. You can add the greens to any soup or salad. Or make broth, pesto (which you can enjoy with the roots) chimichurri, a warm salad (with sesame or black vinegar and soy), an Indian sabzi with potatoes, couscous, or make a warm salad with carrot roots and cabbage. More ideas here. For the roots: we have many recipes on the web, but you can’t beat eating them plain.

Napa Cabbage - Napa cabbage can be large, but that gives you even more cabbage to enjoy. It’s softer and sweeter than green cabbage, more similar to bok choi, thus is a great option for raw dishes, especially slaw. You can use it in any “regular” cabbage recipe (just cook it for less time) or choi recipe, but it can be fun to make something specific to Napa cabbage, and options abound. Napa is the main ingredient in kimchi (which you could make using last week’s white daikon and/or this week’s watermelon daikon). It goes well with noodles (rice noodle stir-fry or in soup), in soup, slaw, roasted (with garlic, mustard, or in steaks), or a stew with tofu and squash (substitute butternut). It can store for about two weeks if stored in a bag in the fridge. If you use your cabbage for multiple dishes, you can peel leaves off the outside or cut, but make sure to wrap it up well before returning to the fridge.

Oranges - These are navel oranges and they're SO good. See the Recipe of the Week for a salad idea. We have several recipes on our website, but like the carrots, you can’t go wrong just eating them plain. For best storage, keep in the refrigerator, though they will be fine on the counter for a few days.

Rutabaga - We love rutabaga. Also called “swede” they are a cross between a turnip and a cabbage. While they can be eaten raw (including with watermelon daikon), they’re most commonly cooked, roasting being one of the best ways to enjoy. They are a good addition to a pan of roasted vegetables (add some watermelon daikon too) and taste good on their own too, cubed or as “fries.” Raw, they have an earthy, slightly peppery taste. Cooking, especially roasting, brings out their sweetness and they get a creamy texture, not unlike a potato, though less starchy. They can substitute for a potato and are very versatile. You can get a rundown of the basic cooking methods here or here. Rutabaga can be roasted, boiled, mashed, stir-fried, pan-roasted, braised, grated raw into salads, used in soups (like lentil or black-eyed pea), stews (quinoa or barley), and curries (plain, with carrot, or butternut). The very adventurous can make a cake! Or make with noodles, cabbage and peanut sauce or tacos. Additional recipe ideas on our website, with additional ideas here, and many ideas for meat eaters here. Store in a plastic bag in the refrigerator – they can keep that way for weeks!

Watermelon Daikon - You'll understand why they're called watermelon daikon when you slice into these beautiful radishes – they’re green on the outside and pink on the inside. They are not only beautiful but delicious and versatile. They’re just larger (and sweeter) radishes, and are drier than the long, white daikon. They can be enjoyed raw: thinly shaved or in matchsticks and added to a salad with apples, grain salad, pasta (with miso, peanuts, and broccoli), crostini, or a grain bowl; grated and added to a slaw (like with Napa cabbage or green cabbage); or cut in wedges or thick slices like a chip for dipping. See the Recipe of the Week for a salad idea. They make great quick pickles (add to a salad!) or add to fermented pickles, like with carrots or kimchi. They can also be roasted (in wedges or chips), steamed, stir-fried, sautéed, boiled in soup. They're not spicy but they get even sweeter when cooked. Watermelon radish also make an excellent addition toast (with tahini, ricotta, goat cheese or hummus) or the ever-popular grain bowls. Additional ideas here or on our website. 

*Click on produce above for Recipes

Veggie Tips

Broccoli – Broccoli in your box can come in a few formats: bunched heads, bunched spears, and loose spears. We get multiple harvests off of each plant. Broccoli first produces a large head and then after that is harvested, the plants send out smaller shoots. The first shoots have longer stems and can be bunched, later shoots are shorter and you’ll get them loose. We’ve got lots of recipe ideas on our website. It also doesn’t need a fancy recipe – it’s great roasted (which you can add to a salad, top with dressing, or have with pasta), steamed (basic instructions here), blanched, stir-fried (with napa cabbage and squash, or with napa and carrots would be great too), or added to soups (like this one with rutabaga). Store broccoli in the refrigerator in a bag, with additional storage tips here.

Butternut Squash - Butternut squash is so versatile (so many recipe ideas on this list or this list). You can eat it with every meal, even breakfast (sweet or savory) and dessert, and it can be even eaten raw! Consider cutting up (try microwaving it to make it easier to peel) and roasting, solo or mixed with root vegetables like rutabaga and carrots (or beets if you still have some around). There are many excellent squash recipes on our website. Store in a cool, dry place until ready to use. Cut squash can be stored in the fridge, ideally left whole, but it also works to store cubes for several days. More storage tips here.

Carrots - We grow super sweet Nantes carrots. More information about our carrots and how we grow and harvest them here. Separate the root from the greens before storing them in the refrigerator, both in bags. Carrot tops are considered an acquired taste by some, but we encourage you to give them a try. You can add the greens to any soup or salad. Or make broth, pesto (which you can enjoy with the roots) chimichurri, a warm salad (with sesame or black vinegar and soy), an Indian sabzi with potatoes, couscous, or make a warm salad with carrot roots and cabbage. More ideas here. For the roots: we have many recipes on the web, but you can’t beat eating them plain.

Napa Cabbage - Napa cabbage can be large, but that gives you even more cabbage to enjoy. It’s softer and sweeter than green cabbage, more similar to bok choi, thus is a great option for raw dishes, especially slaw. You can use it in any “regular” cabbage recipe (just cook it for less time) or choi recipe, but it can be fun to make something specific to Napa cabbage, and options abound. Napa is the main ingredient in kimchi (which you could make using last week’s white daikon and/or this week’s watermelon daikon). It goes well with noodles (rice noodle stir-fry or in soup), in soup, slaw, roasted (with garlic, mustard, or in steaks), or a stew with tofu and squash (substitute butternut). It can store for about two weeks if stored in a bag in the fridge. If you use your cabbage for multiple dishes, you can peel leaves off the outside or cut, but make sure to wrap it up well before returning to the fridge.

Oranges - These are navel oranges and they're SO good. See the Recipe of the Week for a salad idea. We have several recipes on our website, but like the carrots, you can’t go wrong just eating them plain. For best storage, keep in the refrigerator, though they will be fine on the counter for a few days.

Rutabaga - We love rutabaga. Also called “swede” they are a cross between a turnip and a cabbage. While they can be eaten raw (including with watermelon daikon), they’re most commonly cooked, roasting being one of the best ways to enjoy. They are a good addition to a pan of roasted vegetables (add some watermelon daikon too) and taste good on their own too, cubed or as “fries.” Raw, they have an earthy, slightly peppery taste. Cooking, especially roasting, brings out their sweetness and they get a creamy texture, not unlike a potato, though less starchy. They can substitute for a potato and are very versatile. You can get a rundown of the basic cooking methods here or here. Rutabaga can be roasted, boiled, mashed, stir-fried, pan-roasted, braised, grated raw into salads, used in soups (like lentil or black-eyed pea), stews (quinoa or barley), and curries (plain, with carrot, or butternut). The very adventurous can make a cake! Or make with noodles, cabbage and peanut sauce or tacos. Additional recipe ideas on our website, with additional ideas here, and many ideas for meat eaters here. Store in a plastic bag in the refrigerator – they can keep that way for weeks!

Watermelon Daikon - You'll understand why they're called watermelon daikon when you slice into these beautiful radishes – they’re green on the outside and pink on the inside. They are not only beautiful but delicious and versatile. They’re just larger (and sweeter) radishes, and are drier than the long, white daikon. They can be enjoyed raw: thinly shaved or in matchsticks and added to a salad with apples, grain salad, pasta (with miso, peanuts, and broccoli), crostini, or a grain bowl; grated and added to a slaw (like with Napa cabbage or green cabbage); or cut in wedges or thick slices like a chip for dipping. See the Recipe of the Week for a salad idea. They make great quick pickles (add to a salad!) or add to fermented pickles, like with carrots or kimchi. They can also be roasted (in wedges or chips), steamed, stir-fried, sautéed, boiled in soup. They're not spicy but they get even sweeter when cooked. Watermelon radish also make an excellent addition toast (with tahini, ricotta, goat cheese or hummus) or the ever-popular grain bowls. Additional ideas here or on our website.

*Click on produce above for Recipes

Veggie Tips

Broccoli – Broccoli in your box can come in a few formats: bunched heads, bunched spears, and loose spears. We get multiple harvests off of each plant. Broccoli first produces a large head and then after that is harvested, the plants send out smaller shoots. The first shoots have longer stems and can be bunched, later shoots are shorter and you’ll get them loose. We’ve got lots of recipe ideas on our website. It also doesn’t need a fancy recipe – it’s great roasted (which you can add to a salad, top with dressing, or have with pasta), steamed (basic instructions here), blanched, stir-fried (with napa cabbage and squash, or with napa and carrots would be great too), or added to soups (like this one with rutabaga). Store broccoli in the refrigerator in a bag, with additional storage tips here.

Butternut Squash - Butternut squash is so versatile (so many recipe ideas on this list or this list). You can eat it with every meal, even breakfast (sweet or savory) and dessert, and it can be even eaten raw! Consider cutting up (try microwaving it to make it easier to peel) and roasting, solo or mixed with root vegetables like rutabaga and carrots (or beets if you still have some around). There are many excellent squash recipes on our website. Store in a cool, dry place until ready to use. Cut squash can be stored in the fridge, ideally left whole, but it also works to store cubes for several days. More storage tips here.

Carrots - We grow super sweet Nantes carrots. More information about our carrots and how we grow and harvest them here. Separate the root from the greens before storing them in the refrigerator, both in bags. Carrot tops are considered an acquired taste by some, but we encourage you to give them a try. You can add the greens to any soup or salad. Or make broth, pesto (which you can enjoy with the roots) chimichurri, a warm salad (with sesame or black vinegar and soy), an Indian sabzi with potatoes, couscous, or make a warm salad with carrot roots and cabbage. More ideas here. For the roots: we have many recipes on the web, but you can’t beat eating them plain.

Napa Cabbage - Napa cabbage can be large, but that gives you even more cabbage to enjoy. It’s softer and sweeter than green cabbage, more similar to bok choi, thus is a great option for raw dishes, especially slaw. You can use it in any “regular” cabbage recipe (just cook it for less time) or choi recipe, but it can be fun to make something specific to Napa cabbage, and options abound. Napa is the main ingredient in kimchi (which you could make using last week’s white daikon and/or this week’s watermelon daikon). It goes well with noodles (rice noodle stir-fry or in soup), in soup, slaw, roasted (with garlic, mustard, or in steaks), or a stew with tofu and squash (substitute butternut). It can store for about two weeks if stored in a bag in the fridge. If you use your cabbage for multiple dishes, you can peel leaves off the outside or cut, but make sure to wrap it up well before returning to the fridge.

Oranges - These are navel oranges and they're SO good. See the Recipe of the Week for a salad idea. We have several recipes on our website, but like the carrots, you can’t go wrong just eating them plain. For best storage, keep in the refrigerator, though they will be fine on the counter for a few days.

Rutabaga - We love rutabaga. Also called “swede” they are a cross between a turnip and a cabbage. While they can be eaten raw (including with watermelon daikon), they’re most commonly cooked, roasting being one of the best ways to enjoy. They are a good addition to a pan of roasted vegetables (add some watermelon daikon too) and taste good on their own too, cubed or as “fries.” Raw, they have an earthy, slightly peppery taste. Cooking, especially roasting, brings out their sweetness and they get a creamy texture, not unlike a potato, though less starchy. They can substitute for a potato and are very versatile. You can get a rundown of the basic cooking methods here or here. Rutabaga can be roasted, boiled, mashed, stir-fried, pan-roasted, braised, grated raw into salads, used in soups (like lentil or black-eyed pea), stews (quinoa or barley), and curries (plain, with carrot, or butternut). The very adventurous can make a cake! Or make with noodles, cabbage and peanut sauce or tacos. Additional recipe ideas on our website, with additional ideas here, and many ideas for meat eaters here. Store in a plastic bag in the refrigerator – they can keep that way for weeks!

Watermelon Daikon - You'll understand why they're called watermelon daikon when you slice into these beautiful radishes – they’re green on the outside and pink on the inside. They are not only beautiful but delicious and versatile. They’re just larger (and sweeter) radishes, and are drier than the long, white daikon. They can be enjoyed raw: thinly shaved or in matchsticks and added to a salad with apples, grain salad, pasta (with miso, peanuts, and broccoli), crostini, or a grain bowl; grated and added to a slaw (like with Napa cabbage or green cabbage); or cut in wedges or thick slices like a chip for dipping. See the Recipe of the Week for a salad idea. They make great quick pickles (add to a salad!) or add to fermented pickles, like with carrots or kimchi. They can also be roasted (in wedges or chips), steamed, stir-fried, sautéed, boiled in soup. They're not spicy but they get even sweeter when cooked. Watermelon radish also make an excellent addition toast (with tahini, ricotta, goat cheese or hummus) or the ever-popular grain bowls. Additional ideas here or on our website.

*Click on produce above for Recipes

Veggie Tips

Broccoli – Broccoli in your box can come in a few formats: bunched heads, bunched spears, and loose spears. We get multiple harvests off of each plant. Broccoli first produces a large head and then after that is harvested, the plants send out smaller shoots. The first shoots have longer stems and can be bunched, later shoots are shorter and you’ll get them loose. We’ve got lots of recipe ideas on our website. It also doesn’t need a fancy recipe – it’s great roasted (which you can add to a salad, top with dressing, or have with pasta), steamed (basic instructions here), blanched, stir-fried (with napa cabbage and squash, or with napa and carrots would be great too), or added to soups (like this one with rutabaga). Store broccoli in the refrigerator in a bag, with additional storage tips here.

Butternut Squash - Butternut squash is so versatile (so many recipe ideas on this list or this list). You can eat it with every meal, even breakfast (sweet or savory) and dessert, and it can be even eaten raw! Consider cutting up (try microwaving it to make it easier to peel) and roasting, solo or mixed with root vegetables like rutabaga and carrots (or beets if you still have some around). There are many excellent squash recipes on our website. Store in a cool, dry place until ready to use. Cut squash can be stored in the fridge, ideally left whole, but it also works to store cubes for several days. More storage tips here.

Carrots - We grow super sweet Nantes carrots. More information about our carrots and how we grow and harvest them here. Separate the root from the greens before storing them in the refrigerator, both in bags. Carrot tops are considered an acquired taste by some, but we encourage you to give them a try. You can add the greens to any soup or salad. Or make broth, pesto (which you can enjoy with the roots) chimichurri, a warm salad (with sesame or black vinegar and soy), an Indian sabzi with potatoes, couscous, or make a warm salad with carrot roots and cabbage. More ideas here. For the roots: we have many recipes on the web, but you can’t beat eating them plain.

Napa Cabbage - Napa cabbage can be large, but that gives you even more cabbage to enjoy. It’s softer and sweeter than green cabbage, more similar to bok choi, thus is a great option for raw dishes, especially slaw. You can use it in any “regular” cabbage recipe (just cook it for less time) or choi recipe, but it can be fun to make something specific to Napa cabbage, and options abound. Napa is the main ingredient in kimchi (which you could make using last week’s white daikon and/or this week’s watermelon daikon). It goes well with noodles (rice noodle stir-fry or in soup), in soup, slaw, roasted (with garlic, mustard, or in steaks), or a stew with tofu and squash (substitute butternut). It can store for about two weeks if stored in a bag in the fridge. If you use your cabbage for multiple dishes, you can peel leaves off the outside or cut, but make sure to wrap it up well before returning to the fridge.

Oranges - These are navel oranges and they're SO good. See the Recipe of the Week for a salad idea. We have several recipes on our website, but like the carrots, you can’t go wrong just eating them plain. For best storage, keep in the refrigerator, though they will be fine on the counter for a few days.

Rutabaga - We love rutabaga. Also called “swede” they are a cross between a turnip and a cabbage. While they can be eaten raw (including with watermelon daikon), they’re most commonly cooked, roasting being one of the best ways to enjoy. They are a good addition to a pan of roasted vegetables (add some watermelon daikon too) and taste good on their own too, cubed or as “fries.” Raw, they have an earthy, slightly peppery taste. Cooking, especially roasting, brings out their sweetness and they get a creamy texture, not unlike a potato, though less starchy. They can substitute for a potato and are very versatile. You can get a rundown of the basic cooking methods here or here. Rutabaga can be roasted, boiled, mashed, stir-fried, pan-roasted, braised, grated raw into salads, used in soups (like lentil or black-eyed pea), stews (quinoa or barley), and curries (plain, with carrot, or butternut). The very adventurous can make a cake! Or make with noodles, cabbage and peanut sauce or tacos. Additional recipe ideas on our website, with additional ideas here, and many ideas for meat eaters here. Store in a plastic bag in the refrigerator – they can keep that way for weeks!

Watermelon Daikon - You'll understand why they're called watermelon daikon when you slice into these beautiful radishes – they’re green on the outside and pink on the inside. They are not only beautiful but delicious and versatile. They’re just larger (and sweeter) radishes, and are drier than the long, white daikon. They can be enjoyed raw: thinly shaved or in matchsticks and added to a salad with apples, grain salad, pasta (with miso, peanuts, and broccoli), crostini, or a grain bowl; grated and added to a slaw (like with Napa cabbage or green cabbage); or cut in wedges or thick slices like a chip for dipping. See the Recipe of the Week for a salad idea. They make great quick pickles (add to a salad!) or add to fermented pickles, like with carrots or kimchi. They can also be roasted (in wedges or chips), steamed, stir-fried, sautéed, boiled in soup. They're not spicy but they get even sweeter when cooked. Watermelon radish also make an excellent addition toast (with tahini, ricotta, goat cheese or hummus) or the ever-popular grain bowls. Additional ideas here or on our website.