What’s in my box this week?

Click on your delivery date to see what is in your box this week. Note that the web site is updated daily to reflect the NEXT day’s deliveries but before that, will show the information from the previous week. You can check an earlier day in the week to get an idea of what will be in your box, but the contents of your box may be different as the box contents frequently change between days.

*Click on produce above for Recipes

This Week's Flowers: a Safflower, Sunflowers, and Statice trio

Veggie Tips

Basil – To keep basil fresh, trim the stems and place the bunch in a glass or jar of water, just like a bouquet of flowers. Loosely cover with a plastic bag and leave on the counter; don’t refrigerate! You will see some flowers with your basil; the flowers are edible and have a variety of uses (see this page for a few ideas). As for the leaves, see the Recipe of the Week and there are many more recipes on our website. You can always make and freeze a batch of pesto for a later date. But since basil goes with everything in your box this week, we suspect you won’t have any trouble breezing through it.
Corn – this is sweet, bicolor corn, harvested right before we pack the boxes. You’ve got several options in terms of how to cook your corn if you’re looking to enjoy it on the cob (for a rundown, see this list, this list, or this ranking). But one of our favorite ways to eat corn is raw; worth trying at least once to really appreciate it’s freshness, either on the cob or off, like the Recipe of the Week. If you're taking the corn off the cob, see here for tips on the best way to do so. You can also cook your corn and and add to dishes like grain salads, with other vegetables, frittatas, and it goes well with green beans and summer squash any way you make it. Or you can make tacos, a skillet, stir-fry, a succotash with the summer produce of your choice, and more. Keep husked corn refrigerated, wrapped in a plastic bag to keep it from drying out, and the sooner you use it the better because the sugars turn to starch over time and it won't taste as sweet. You can also cook and store the corn for later.
Green Beans – green beans don’t need much to taste great. You can eat them raw, or they are very simple to cook. They can be lightly cooked (quickly blanched, steamed, stir-fried, or sautéed), or even roasted or braised. They make a great salad with potatoes (like this recipe, or one of or these two on our website, or a nicoise salad). See the Recipe of the Week.
Onions
Plums – these are Santa Rosa plums, developed by Luther Burbank in Santa Rosa in the early 1900s. They have a sweet interior and slightly tart skin. Santa Rosa plums are semi-firm when ripe. You can ripen them on the counter to your desired level of softness. After, they should be stored in your refrigerator. They are great eaten as-is, but you can also make a quick compote, or slice and add to salads, yogurt or ice cream, make into a baked good (like a galette, tart, bread, torte, crumble, or crisp), and more.
Potatoes – remember to store your potatoes in the refrigerator.
Summer Squash – have you tried zucchini raw? At least up in Guinda, it’s going to be a hot week, and while sautéed zucchini tastes great, the less cooking the better. You can have a raw zucchini salad like the Recipe of the Week (or without green beans like this recipe or this one), add it to pasta, couscous, or other grains, or make a slaw (if you’ve still got some cabbage from last week – try this recipe). Additional ideas on our website. Squash should be stored in the fridge (ideally in the crisper drawer). You can store squash in the bag they comes in or move them to a plastic bag; especially if using a plastic bag, make sure it isn't completely sealed so that there is some air circulation. You don’t want them to dry out and get squishy but moisture is also something to avoid. Don't wash your squash until you're ready to use them.

*Click on produce above for Recipes

This Week's Flowers: a Safflower, Sunflowers, and Statice trio

Veggie Tips

Apricotsthis is our last week of Royal Blenheim apricots; it was a great, though always too short, season. They ripen from the inside out and might have a slight green tinge on their shoulders - this green color is unique to this variety and doesn't mean that they're underripe. They should be stored stem side down on a flat surface, ideally on the counter. They will ripen fast, so keep a close eye on them, and keep in mind that they don’t need to be soft to be ripe. If you need to slow down ripening, move them to the refrigerator, though extended time in a refrigerator can negatively impact their texture.

Basil – To keep basil fresh, trim the stems and place the bunch in a glass or jar of water, just like a bouquet of flowers. Loosely cover with a plastic bag and leave on the counter; don’t refrigerate! You will see some flowers with your basil; the flowers are edible and have a variety of uses (see this page for a few ideas). As for the leaves, see the Recipe of the Week and there are many more recipes on our website. You can always make and freeze a batch of pesto for a later date. But since basil goes with everything in your box this week, we suspect you won’t have any trouble breezing through it.
Corn – this is sweet, bicolor corn, harvested right before we pack the boxes. You’ve got several options in terms of how to cook your corn if you’re looking to enjoy it on the cob (for a rundown, see this list, this list, or this ranking). But one of our favorite ways to eat corn is raw; worth trying at least once to really appreciate it’s freshness, either on the cob or off, like the Recipe of the Week. If you're taking the corn off the cob, see here for tips on the best way to do so. You can also cook your corn and and add to dishes like grain salads, with other vegetables, frittatas, and it goes well with green beans and summer squash any way you make it. Or you can make tacos, a skillet, stir-fry, a succotash with the summer produce of your choice, and more. Keep husked corn refrigerated, wrapped in a plastic bag to keep it from drying out, and the sooner you use it the better because the sugars turn to starch over time and it won't taste as sweet. You can also cook and store the corn for later.
Green Beans – green beans don’t need much to taste great. You can eat them raw, or they are very simple to cook. They can be lightly cooked (quickly blanched, steamed, stir-fried, or sautéed), or even roasted or braised. They make a great salad with potatoes (like this recipe, or one of or these two on our website, or a nicoise salad). See the Recipe of the Week.
Onions
Potatoes – remember to store your potatoes in the refrigerator.
Summer Squash – have you tried zucchini raw? At least up in Guinda, it’s going to be a hot week, and while sautéed zucchini tastes great, the less cooking the better. You can have a raw zucchini salad like the Recipe of the Week (or without green beans like this recipe or this one), add it to pasta, couscous, or other grains, or make a slaw (if you’ve still got some cabbage from last week – try this recipe). Additional ideas on our website. Squash should be stored in the fridge (ideally in the crisper drawer). You can store squash in the bag they comes in or move them to a plastic bag; especially if using a plastic bag, make sure it isn't completely sealed so that there is some air circulation. You don’t want them to dry out and get squishy but moisture is also something to avoid. Don't wash your squash until you're ready to use them.

*Click on produce above for Recipes

This Week's Flowers: Black-Eyed Susan (Rudbeckia)

Veggie Tips

Apricots – this is probably our last week of Royal Blenheim apricots; they don’t like the really hot weather that is in the forecast for this week. They ripen from the inside out and might have a slight green tinge on their shoulders - this green color is unique to this variety and doesn't mean that they're underripe. They should be stored stem side down on a flat surface, ideally on the counter. They will ripen fast, so keep a close eye on them, and keep in mind that they don’t need to be very soft to be ripe. If you need to slow down ripening, move them to the refrigerator, though extended time in a refrigerator can negatively impact their texture.

Beets – have you made a beet caprese salad? Cook your beets (roast, steam, boil), peel when cool, slice, and then proceed as you would with a tomato caprese - combine with mozzarella or burrata, basil, olive oil, balsamic vinegar, salt, and pepper. Beets also make an excellent salad with green beans (roasted, blanched, or even microwaved) or with potatoes.

Cabbage – We have so many good recipes on our website, whether you like your cabbage raw or cooked. See the Recipe of the Week. Additional ideas: a slaw (with beets, green beans, carrots, or ginger and lemon), grilled, with rice noodles or udon, or curry with potatoes.

Carrots – these are the same great carrots you know and love, just without the greens. They make an excellent snack raw, but if you’re looking for additional inspiration, check out the recipes on our website.

Garlic

Potatoes – Remember to store your potatoes in the refrigerator. We’ve been harvesting several types of potatoes and hopefully you’ll get to try them all: All Blue, Bintje, French Fingerling, Red Lasoda, Russian Banana, and Yellow Finn.

Summer Squash – have you tried zucchini raw? At least up in our area, it’s going to be a hot week, and the less cooking the better. You can have a raw zucchini salad (like this recipe or this one), add it to pasta, couscous, or other grains, or make a slaw, like the Recipe of the Week. For those who prefer something sweeter, you can make zucchini, zucchini/beet, zucchini/carrot, or zucchini/carrot/beet bread or muffins. Additional ideas on our website.

*Click on produce above for Recipes

This Week's Flowers: Black-Eyed Susan (Rudbeckia)

Veggie Tips

Apricots – These are Royal Blenheim apricots, which are a considered one of the most flavorful apricot varieties out there, with some calling them the "pinot noir of apricots." Their delicate skin bruises easily so in the larger world of apricot growing, they've largely been replaced with other varieties that are firmer and easier to transport, and are more resistant to sunburn, disease, and weather fluctuations. More info about their history here. Blenheims ripen from the inside out and might have a slight green tinge on their shoulders - this green color is unique to this variety and doesn't mean that they're underripe. They should be stored stem side down on a flat surface, ideally on the counter. They will ripen fast, so keep a close eye on them, and keep in mind that they don’t need to be very soft to be ripe. But if you want to speed up ripening, put them in a paper bag. If you need to slow down ripening, move them to the refrigerator, though extended time in a refrigerator can negatively impact their texture.

Beets – have you made a beet caprese salad? Cook your beets (roast, steam, boil), peel when cool, slice, and then proceed as you would with a tomato caprese - combine with mozzarella or burrata, basil, olive oil, balsamic vinegar, salt, and pepper. Beets also make an excellent salad with green beans (roasted, blanched, or even microwaved) or with potatoes.

Cabbage – We have so many good recipes on our website, whether you like your cabbage raw or cooked. See the Recipe of the Week. Additional ideas: a slaw (with beets, green beans, carrots, or ginger and lemon), grilled, with rice noodles or udon, or curry with potatoes.

Carrots – these are the same great carrots you know and love, just without the greens. They make an excellent snack raw, but if you’re looking for additional inspiration, check out the recipes on our website. And save one for the Recipe of the Week.

Corn – the first corn of the summer! This is sweet, bicolor corn, harvested right before we pack the boxes. You’ve got several options in terms of how to cook your corn (for a rundown, see this list, this list, or this ranking). But one of our favorite ways to eat corn is raw – either straight off the cob or cut off and added to a salad.

Garlic

Potatoes – Remember to store your potatoes in the refrigerator. We’ve been harvesting several types of potatoes and hopefully you’ll get to try them all: All Blue, Bintje, French Fingerling, Red Lasoda, Russian Banana, and Yellow Finn.

*Click on produce above for Recipes

This Week's Flowers: Black-Eyed Susan (Rudbeckia)

Veggie Tips

Apricots – These are Royal Blenheim apricots, which are a considered one of the most flavorful apricot varieties out there, with some calling them the "pinot noir of apricots." Their delicate skin bruises easily so in the larger world of apricot growing, they've largely been replaced with other varieties that are firmer and easier to transport, and are more resistant to sunburn, disease, and weather fluctuations. More info about their history here. Blenheims ripen from the inside out and might have a slight green tinge on their shoulders - this green color is unique to this variety and doesn't mean that they're underripe. They should be stored stem side down on a flat surface, ideally on the counter. They will ripen fast, so keep a close eye on them, and keep in mind that they don’t need to be very soft to be ripe. But if you want to speed up ripening, put them in a paper bag. If you need to slow down ripening, move them to the refrigerator, though extended time in a refrigerator can negatively impact their texture.

Beets – have you made a beet caprese salad? Cook your beets (roast, steam, boil), peel when cool, slice, and then proceed as you would with a tomato caprese - combine with mozzarella or burrata, basil, olive oil, balsamic vinegar, salt, and pepper. Beets also make an excellent salad with green beans (roasted, blanched, or even microwaved) or with potatoes.

Cabbage – We have so many good recipes on our website, whether you like your cabbage raw or cooked. See the Recipe of the Week. Additional ideas: a slaw (with beets, green beans, carrots, or ginger and lemon), grilled, with rice noodles or udon, or curry with potatoes.

Carrots – these are the same great carrots you know and love, just without the greens. They make an excellent snack raw, but if you’re looking for additional inspiration, check out the recipes on our website. And save one for the Recipe of the Week.

Corn – the first corn of the summer! This is sweet, bicolor corn, harvested right before we pack the boxes. You’ve got several options in terms of how to cook your corn (for a rundown, see this list, this list, or this ranking). But one of our favorite ways to eat corn is raw – either straight off the cob or cut off and added to a salad.

Garlic

Potatoes – Remember to store your potatoes in the refrigerator. We’ve been harvesting several types of potatoes and hopefully you’ll get to try them all: All Blue, Bintje, French Fingerling, Red Lasoda, Russian Banana, and Yellow Finn.