What’s in my box this week?

Click on your delivery date to see what is in your box this week. Note that the web site is updated daily to reflect the NEXT day’s deliveries but before that, will show the information from the previous week. You can check an earlier day in the week to get an idea of what will be in your box, but the contents of your box may be different as the box contents frequently change between days.

*Click on produce above for Recipes

Veggie Tips

Broccoli Rabe – Also spelled “raab,” it is more closely related to turnips, thus tastes like turnip greens, not like broccoli. For cooking, you can make a dish that's raab-specific or you can substitute it for most other leafy greens, especially the more tender greens, like chard or mustard greens. It can be a bit more on the bitter and earthy side, it’s often recommended that you first blanch and then sauté, but blanching isn’t necessary and you can skip that step and just sauté. Additional recipe ideas: with roasted potatoes, raw in a salad, in a sandwich, in a soup (lentil or bean), with tofu, with farro, with white beans (and polenta or in a soup) or with pasta (add raisins). Lots more ideas on this page. Store in the refrigerator in a bag.
Cabbage – Cabbage is one of the most versatile vegetables around – see our website’s cabbage page for proof. And it stores well (refrigerated, in a bag) too. See the Recipe of the Week. A few more ideas: a stir-fry with daikon, with miso and brown sugar, curry with squash, or soup (if you still have fennel!). You can also make sauerkraut, or pickle with daikon or with daikon and apple.
Daikon – Don’t be intimidated by daikon. It’s a member of the radish family and you can use it anywhere you’d use its smaller cousins. They can grow to be quite large and are difficult to get out of the ground whole, especially in soils that contain more clay, like ours, so you might get a root that’s missing the bottom. Daikon is the white part of the pickle included in a bahn mi sandwich, the main component in the popular dim sum dish lo bak go (here's one of many recipes), kkakdugi (daikon-only kimchi), and the yellow takuan Japanese pickled radish (quick pickled or fermented). It commonly appears in Japanese (shredded finely or in soup with squash) and Indian cooking (like this curry or this stir-fry) and it goes well in miso soup (you can use rabe), boiled, stir-fried, braised, raw in a salad (grated plain or with mizuna), mashed, quick-pickled, or roasted (as “fries”, cubes, or wedges). See the Recipe of the Week. Additional ideas here or here or on our website.
Leeks – Leeks are great – they are a member of the onion family and can be used as the base for cooking any dish, but they can also be the star of the show – we love braised leeks and sautéed too. They pair well with potatoes and squash, but can really go in anything – see our website for recipe ideas or the Recipe of the Week. And for a few more: potato leek soup with broccoli rabe, miso soup with daikon, pizza with potato, on polenta, or pasta (or pasta with cabbage). Do not trim or wash before storing. Leeks have a strong order so  wrap leeks in plastic when storing in the refrigerator. Leeks will last up to two weeks. Be sure to rinse well, or put cut leeks in a bowl of water to remove the dirt and grit that can get stuck between the leaves. People often don’t cook with the tougher green tops – save for veggie stock!
Mizuna – Mizuna is a member of the mustard family but is much more mild and sweet than some of the other mustard varieties. We grow three varieties: all green, all purple, and green with a purple stem. It is often incorporated into salad mixes and enjoyed raw but can also be cooked. In Japan, it’s rarely eaten raw and instead is usually stir-fried, sautéed, simmered, or added to soups. When using in hot dishes, the leaves should be added at the end of cooking so the leaves can wilt. Like spinach or arugula, mizuna will shrink quite a bit when cooked. See the Recipe of the Week for one ideaYou can make a pesto, add it to miso soup (including with daikon), make a salad (add squash), or add to potatoes. You can substitute mizuna for arugula in any recipe. Store in the refrigerator in a bag.
Potatoes – Bintje potatoes (white) or La Soda (red). Store in the refrigerator – we always advise that for our potatoes but it’s especially important when they’re new potatoes and haven’t been cured. They make excellent roasted or mashed potatoes or soup with leeks.
Tetsukabuto Squash – This is our first year growing this squash and we love it. It’s a butternut-kabocha cross that’s sweet like a kabocha but a little less dry, like a butternut. You can learn more about it here. It has a very long shelf life! It holds it shape well, perfect for curries and soups, and is amazing just sliced and roasted (either in half or in wedges). Try Dru’s favorite roasted squash method: cut the squash in half and instead of roasting cut side down, keep it cut side up and drizzle a little bit of coconut milk (the kind from the can, not the drinking kind) in the center before roasting. The skin is edible, though a little thick.

*Click on produce above for Recipes

Veggie Tips

Bok Choi – We grow three types of bok choy – the large white, stemmed (joi choi), the shorter green-stemmed (mei qing, or Shanghai), and purple. All have different shapes but are equally delicious with crunchy stems and soft leaves. The bigger variety could even be used like lettuce wraps.  Bok choi makes a great stir-fry (especially with daikon or with leeks, and there are several recipes on our website) and goes well with winter squash, like Tetsukabuto (wonton soup, lentil soup, miso soup with daikon, stir-fry, a frittata, even pizza!).  You can add some to the Recipe of the Week too, or make a soup, noodles, curry, risotto (with leeks, in the oven, or in an Instant Pot), or enjoy it raw in a salad. Store in the refrigerator in a bag.
Cabbage – Cabbage is one of the most versatile vegetables around – see our website’s cabbage page for proof. And it stores well (refrigerated, in a bag) too. See the Recipe of the Week. A few more ideas: a stir-fry with daikon, with miso and brown sugar, curry with squash, or soup (if you still have fennel!). You can also make sauerkraut, or pickle with daikon or with daikon and apple.
Daikon – Don’t be intimidated by daikon. It’s a member of the radish family and you can use it anywhere you’d use its smaller cousins. They can grow to be quite large and are difficult to get out of the ground whole, especially in soils that contain more clay, like ours, so you might get a root that’s missing the bottom. Daikon is the white part of the pickle included in a bahn mi sandwich, the main component in the popular dim sum dish lo bak go (here's one of many recipes), kkakdugi (daikon-only kimchi), and the yellow takuan Japanese pickled radish (quick pickled or fermented). It commonly appears in Japanese (shredded finely or in soup with squash) and Indian cooking (like this curry or this stir-fry) and it goes well in miso soup (you can use rabe), boiled, stir-fried, braised, raw in a salad (grated plain or with mizuna), mashed, quick-pickled, or roasted (as “fries”, cubes, or wedges). See the Recipe of the Week. Additional ideas here or here or on our website.
Leeks – Leeks are great – they are a member of the onion family and can be used as the base for cooking any dish, but they can also be the star of the show – we love braised leeks and sautéed too. They pair well with potatoes and squash, but can really go in anything – see our website for recipe ideas or the Recipe of the Week. And for a few more: potato leek soup with broccoli rabe, miso soup with daikon, pizza with potato, on polenta, or pasta (or pasta with cabbage). Do not trim or wash before storing. Leeks have a strong order so  wrap leeks in plastic when storing in the refrigerator. Leeks will last up to two weeks. Be sure to rinse well, or put cut leeks in a bowl of water to remove the dirt and grit that can get stuck between the leaves. People often don’t cook with the tougher green tops – save for veggie stock!
Mizuna – Mizuna is a member of the mustard family but is much more mild and sweet than some of the other mustard varieties. We grow three varieties: all green, all purple, and green with a purple stem. It is often incorporated into salad mixes and enjoyed raw but can also be cooked. In Japan, it’s rarely eaten raw and instead is usually stir-fried, sautéed, simmered, or added to soups. When using in hot dishes, the leaves should be added at the end of cooking so the leaves can wilt. Like spinach or arugula, mizuna will shrink quite a bit when cooked. See the Recipe of the Week for one ideaYou can make a pesto, add it to miso soup (including with daikon), make a salad (add squash), or add to potatoes. You can substitute mizuna for arugula in any recipe. Store in the refrigerator in a bag.
Potatoes – Bintje potatoes (white) or La Soda (red). Store in the refrigerator – we always advise that for our potatoes but it’s especially important when they’re new potatoes and haven’t been cured. They make excellent roasted or mashed potatoes or soup with leeks.
Tetsukabuto Squash – This is our first year growing this squash and we love it. It’s a butternut-kabocha cross that’s sweet like a kabocha but a little less dry, like a butternut. You can learn more about it here. It has a very long shelf life! It holds it shape well, perfect for curries and soups, and is amazing just sliced and roasted (either in half or in wedges). Try Dru’s favorite roasted squash method: cut the squash in half and instead of roasting cut side down, keep it cut side up and drizzle a little bit of coconut milk (the kind from the can, not the drinking kind) in the center before roasting. The skin is edible, though a little thick.

*Click on produce above for Recipes

Veggie Tips

Bok Choi – We grow three types of bok choy – the large white, stemmed (joi choi), the shorter green-stemmed (mei qing, or Shanghai), and purple. All have different shapes but are equally delicious with crunchy stems and soft leaves. The bigger variety could even be used like lettuce wraps.  Bok choi makes a great stir-fry (especially with daikon or with leeks, and there are several recipes on our website) and goes well with winter squash, like Tetsukabuto (wonton soup, lentil soup, miso soup with daikon, stir-fry, a frittata, even pizza!).  You can add some to the Recipe of the Week too, or make a soup, noodles, curry, risotto (with leeks, in the oven, or in an Instant Pot), or enjoy it raw in a salad. Store in the refrigerator in a bag.
Cabbage – Cabbage is one of the most versatile vegetables around – see our website’s cabbage page for proof. And it stores well (refrigerated, in a bag) too. See the Recipe of the Week. A few more ideas: a stir-fry with daikon, with miso and brown sugar, curry with squash, or soup (if you still have fennel!). You can also make sauerkraut, or pickle with daikon or with daikon and apple.
Daikon – Don’t be intimidated by daikon. It’s a member of the radish family and you can use it anywhere you’d use its smaller cousins. They can grow to be quite large and are difficult to get out of the ground whole, especially in soils that contain more clay, like ours, so you might get a root that’s missing the bottom. Daikon is the white part of the pickle included in a bahn mi sandwich, the main component in the popular dim sum dish lo bak go (here's one of many recipes), kkakdugi (daikon-only kimchi), and the yellow takuan Japanese pickled radish (quick pickled or fermented). It commonly appears in Japanese (shredded finely or in soup with squash) and Indian cooking (like this curry or this stir-fry) and it goes well in miso soup (you can use rabe), boiled, stir-fried, braised, raw in a salad (grated plain or with mizuna), mashed, quick-pickled, or roasted (as “fries”, cubes, or wedges). See the Recipe of the Week. Additional ideas here or here or on our website.
Leeks – Leeks are great – they are a member of the onion family and can be used as the base for cooking any dish, but they can also be the star of the show – we love braised leeks and sautéed too. They pair well with potatoes and squash, but can really go in anything – see our website for recipe ideas or the Recipe of the Week. And for a few more: potato leek soup with broccoli rabe, miso soup with daikon, pizza with potato, on polenta, or pasta (or pasta with cabbage). Do not trim or wash before storing. Leeks have a strong order so  wrap leeks in plastic when storing in the refrigerator. Leeks will last up to two weeks. Be sure to rinse well, or put cut leeks in a bowl of water to remove the dirt and grit that can get stuck between the leaves. People often don’t cook with the tougher green tops – save for veggie stock!
Mizuna – Mizuna is a member of the mustard family but is much more mild and sweet than some of the other mustard varieties. We grow three varieties: all green, all purple, and green with a purple stem. It is often incorporated into salad mixes and enjoyed raw but can also be cooked. In Japan, it’s rarely eaten raw and instead is usually stir-fried, sautéed, simmered, or added to soups. When using in hot dishes, the leaves should be added at the end of cooking so the leaves can wilt. Like spinach or arugula, mizuna will shrink quite a bit when cooked. See the Recipe of the Week for one ideaYou can make a pesto, add it to miso soup (including with daikon), make a salad (add squash), or add to potatoes. You can substitute mizuna for arugula in any recipe. Store in the refrigerator in a bag.
Potatoes – Bintje potatoes (white) or La Soda (red). Store in the refrigerator – we always advise that for our potatoes but it’s especially important when they’re new potatoes and haven’t been cured. They make excellent roasted or mashed potatoes or soup with leeks.
Tetsukabuto Squash – This is our first year growing this squash and we love it. It’s a butternut-kabocha cross that’s sweet like a kabocha but a little less dry, like a butternut. You can learn more about it here. It has a very long shelf life! It holds it shape well, perfect for curries and soups, and is amazing just sliced and roasted (either in half or in wedges). Try Dru’s favorite roasted squash method: cut the squash in half and instead of roasting cut side down, keep it cut side up and drizzle a little bit of coconut milk (the kind from the can, not the drinking kind) in the center before roasting. The skin is edible, though a little thick.

*Click on produce above for Recipes

Veggie Tips

Cabbage – Cabbage is one of the most versatile vegetables around – see our website’s cabbage page for proof. And it stores well (refrigerated, in a bag) too. See the Recipe of the Week. A few more ideas: a stir-fry with daikon, with miso and brown sugar, curry with squash, or soup (if you still have fennel!). You can also make sauerkraut, or pickle with daikon or with daikon and apple.
Daikon – Don’t be intimidated by daikon. It’s a member of the radish family and you can use it anywhere you’d use its smaller cousins. They can grow to be quite large and are difficult to get out of the ground whole, especially in soils that contain more clay, like ours, so you might get a root that’s missing the bottom. Daikon is the white part of the pickle included in a bahn mi sandwich, the main component in the popular dim sum dish lo bak go (here's one of many recipes), kkakdugi (daikon-only kimchi), and the yellow takuan Japanese pickled radish (quick pickled or fermented). It commonly appears in Japanese (shredded finely or in soup with squash) and Indian cooking (like this curry or this stir-fry) and it goes well in miso soup (you can use rabe), boiled, stir-fried, braised, raw in a salad (grated plain or with mizuna), mashed, quick-pickled, or roasted (as “fries”, cubes, or wedges). See the Recipe of the Week. Additional ideas here or here or on our website.

Leeks – Leeks are great – they are a member of the onion family and can be used as the base for cooking any dish, but they can also be the star of the show – we love braised leeks and sautéed too. They pair well with potatoes and squash, but can really go in anything – see our website for recipe ideas or the Recipe of the Week. And for a few more: miso soup with daikon, pizza with potato, on polenta, or pasta (or pasta with cabbage). Do not trim or wash before storing. Leeks have a strong order so  wrap leeks in plastic when storing in the refrigerator. Leeks will last up to two weeks. Be sure to rinse well, or put cut leeks in a bowl of water to remove the dirt and grit that can get stuck between the leaves. People often don’t cook with the tougher green tops – save for veggie stock!

Mizuna – Mizuna is a member of the mustard family but is much more mild and sweet than some of the other mustard varieties. We grow three varieties: all green, all purple, and green with a purple stem. It is often incorporated into salad mixes and enjoyed raw but can also be cooked. In Japan, it’s rarely eaten raw and instead is usually stir-fried, sautéed, simmered, or added to soups. When using in hot dishes, the leaves should be added at the end of cooking so the leaves can wilt. Like spinach or arugula, mizuna will shrink quite a bit when cooked. See the Recipe of the Week for one ideaYou can make a pesto, add it to miso soup (including with daikon), make a salad (add squash), or add to potatoes. You can substitute mizuna for arugula in any recipe. Store in the refrigerator in a bag.

Potatoes – Bintje potatoes (white) or La Soda (red). Store in the refrigerator – we always advise that for our potatoes but it’s especially important when they’re new potatoes and haven’t been cured. They make excellent roasted or mashed potatoes or soup with leeks.

Spigarello –Do you like dino kale and collards? If so, you’ll love spigarello. Also known as leaf broccoli, it tastes somewhere between collards and dino kale and you can use it in most of the greens recipes on our website that call for kale or collards (or any other recipe – like this dal). We find it’s best cooked, not raw. Like most members of the brassica family, spigarello goes well with pasta, potatoes, and winter squash and can be enjoyed in a simple sauté with garlic, eggs, raisins and pine nuts, or cheese. To combine it with produce in your box: a stir-fry with cabbage (spicy or with carrots), with daikon (seared, soba noodles, or a curry), sauteed with leeks (or mujadara or dirty rice without lentils), or squash (pasta or wild rice soup). Store in the refrigerator in a bag.

Tetsukabuto Squash – This is our first year growing this squash and we love it. It’s a butternut-kabocha cross that’s sweet like a kabocha but a little less dry, like a butternut. You can learn more about it here. It has a very long shelf life! It holds it shape well, perfect for curries and soups, and is amazing just sliced and roasted (either in half or in wedges). Try Dru’s favorite roasted squash method: cut the squash in half and instead of roasting cut side down, keep it cut side up and drizzle a little bit of coconut milk (the kind from the can, not the drinking kind) in the center before roasting. The skin is edible, though a little thick.

*Click on produce above for Recipes

Veggie Tips

Bok Choi – We grow three types of bok choy – the large white, stemmed (joi choi), the shorter green-stemmed (mei qing, or Shanghai), and purple. All have different shapes but are equally delicious with crunchy stems and soft leaves. The bigger variety could even be used like lettuce wraps.  Bok choi makes a great stir-fry (especially with daikon or with leeks, and there are several recipes on our website) and goes well with winter squash, like Tetsukabuto (wonton soup, lentil soup, miso soup with daikon, stir-fry, a frittata, even pizza!).  You can add some to the Recipe of the Week too, or make a soup, noodles, curry, risotto (with leeks, in the oven, or in an Instant Pot), or enjoy it raw in a salad. Store in the refrigerator in a bag.
Cabbage – Cabbage is one of the most versatile vegetables around – see our website’s cabbage page for proof. And it stores well (refrigerated, in a bag) too. See the Recipe of the Week. A few more ideas: a stir-fry with daikon, with miso and brown sugar, curry with squash, or soup (if you still have fennel!). You can also make sauerkraut, or pickle with daikon or with daikon and apple.
Daikon – Don’t be intimidated by daikon. It’s a member of the radish family and you can use it anywhere you’d use its smaller cousins. They can grow to be quite large and are difficult to get out of the ground whole, especially in soils that contain more clay, like ours, so you might get a root that’s missing the bottom. Daikon is the white part of the pickle included in a bahn mi sandwich, the main component in the popular dim sum dish lo bak go (here's one of many recipes), kkakdugi (daikon-only kimchi), and the yellow takuan Japanese pickled radish (quick pickled or fermented). It commonly appears in Japanese (shredded finely or in soup with squash) and Indian cooking (like this curry or this stir-fry) and it goes well in miso soup (you can use rabe), boiled, stir-fried, braised, raw in a salad (grated plain or with mizuna), mashed, quick-pickled, or roasted (as “fries”, cubes, or wedges). See the Recipe of the Week. Additional ideas here or here or on our website.
Leeks – Leeks are great – they are a member of the onion family and can be used as the base for cooking any dish, but they can also be the star of the show – we love braised leeks and sautéed too. They pair well with potatoes and squash, but can really go in anything – see our website for recipe ideas or the Recipe of the Week. And for a few more: miso soup with daikon, pizza with potato, on polenta, or pasta (or pasta with cabbage). Do not trim or wash before storing. Leeks have a strong order so  wrap leeks in plastic when storing in the refrigerator. Leeks will last up to two weeks. Be sure to rinse well, or put cut leeks in a bowl of water to remove the dirt and grit that can get stuck between the leaves. People often don’t cook with the tougher green tops – save for veggie stock!
Mizuna – Mizuna is a member of the mustard family but is much more mild and sweet than some of the other mustard varieties. We grow three varieties: all green, all purple, and green with a purple stem. It is often incorporated into salad mixes and enjoyed raw but can also be cooked. In Japan, it’s rarely eaten raw and instead is usually stir-fried, sautéed, simmered, or added to soups. When using in hot dishes, the leaves should be added at the end of cooking so the leaves can wilt. Like spinach or arugula, mizuna will shrink quite a bit when cooked. See the Recipe of the Week for one ideaYou can make a pesto, add it to miso soup (including with daikon), make a salad (add squash), or add to potatoes. You can substitute mizuna for arugula in any recipe. Store in the refrigerator in a bag.
Potatoes – Bintje potatoes (white) or La Soda (red). Store in the refrigerator – we always advise that for our potatoes but it’s especially important when they’re new potatoes and haven’t been cured. They make excellent roasted or mashed potatoes or soup with leeks.
Tetsukabuto Squash – This is our first year growing this squash and we love it. It’s a butternut-kabocha cross that’s sweet like a kabocha but a little less dry, like a butternut. You can learn more about it here. It has a very long shelf life! It holds it shape well, perfect for curries and soups, and is amazing just sliced and roasted (either in half or in wedges). Try Dru’s favorite roasted squash method: cut the squash in half and instead of roasting cut side down, keep it cut side up and drizzle a little bit of coconut milk (the kind from the can, not the drinking kind) in the center before roasting. The skin is edible, though a little thick.