What’s in my box this week?

Click on your delivery date to see what is in your box this week. Note that the web site is updated daily to reflect the NEXT day’s deliveries but before that, will show the information from the previous week. You can check an earlier day in the week to get an idea of what will be in your box, but the contents of your box may be different as the box contents frequently change between days.

*Click on produce above for Recipes

This Week's Flowers: a mixed bouquet

Veggie Tips

Asian Pears – Some Asian pear varieties ripen in the fall, but our varieties are ripe already! They’ve got a delicate floral, sweet-tart flavor and a great crunchy, crispy texture, more like an apple. They make a great snack and are a popular addition to salads. While often added to a green salad, they can also be combined with melon or watermelon or cucumber and avocado or make a slaw. If going a sweet route, you can poach, bake, sauté, or steam (this recipe for the Korean dessert Baesuk includes steaming or poaching options), or make a quickbread or galette. They should be stored in the refrigerator in a bag.

Garlic

Melon – We grow several types of melons. To identify what you’ve got in your box, see the melon page on our website. In general, melons should be stored at room temperature in a cool spot. However if your melon is very ripe (and we do try to harvest them ripe!) move it to the refrigerator. Some of us enjoy our melons chilled and move them to the fridge to cool down before eating, while others prefer them at room temperature and let their refrigerated melons warm up before eating. Add melons to summer drinks, juice, and smoothies, fresh or frozen. We often just cut melons in half and eat them with a spoon, but if you want a recipe to add them to a dish, check out our website. NOTE: many melons have a blemish on one side, which can range from discoloration to small brown, pitted marks. This is the “ground spot,” where the melon was resting on the ground and it doesn’t mean a melon is bad or unsafe to eat.

Parsley –It’s very easy to use up a whole bunch of parsley if you make tabbouleh (with bulgur, quinoa, lentils, or pasta), a cilantro sauce (like one on this list), a parsley salad, or another parsley-heavy dish. But if you’re using it slowly and are looking to keep it fresh for a longer period, you should keep it in the refrigerator in a plastic bag, a plastic bag wrapped in a damp paper towel, or in a glass of water (like a bunch of flowers, or basil), also in the refrigerator. There’s debate about whether parsley in a jar should be refrigerated and if it should be covered with a bag; we recommend refrigeration with a bag to prevent it from drying out. Parsley goes with all summer produce so if you add a sprinkle here and there (like on potatoes in a salad or pan-fried, tomato salsa, fattoush salad, or peppers), you’ll definitely get through the bunch. Save a little bit for the Recipe of the Week.

Peppers – See our pepper page to see all the varieties we’re growing. All are sweet and can be enjoyed raw or cooked. Grilling or roasting peppers really brings out their sweetness and the thin-skinned peppers like Jimmy Nardellos cook very quickly. Roasted and grilled peppers can be marinated and can be added to salads, like the Recipe of the Week or a bread salad (panzanella) sandwiches, salads, pasta, and more. You can also make a quick meal like this gnocchi dish.

Potatoes – We recommend that you keep our potatoes in the refrigerator for optimal storage. One idea to combine with your tomatoes is this Italian casserole.

Tomatoes – Tomatoes are best stored on the counter at room temperature, stem side down. Keep an eye on them to monitor for ripeness. There is a lot of debate about refrigerating tomatoes; the best temperature for storing tomatoes is 55 degrees, much warmer than the standard refrigerator. As a result, we only recommend moving your tomatoes to the fridge when they are really ripe and you’re worried about them going bad. And of course, always refrigerate cut tomatoes. If refrigerating, take the whole or cut tomato out of the fridge to get back to room temperature before eating to get the best taste. See our website for other ideas.

*Click on produce above for Recipes

This Week's Flowers: a mixed bouquet

Veggie Tips

Asian Pears – Some Asian pear varieties ripen in the fall, but our varieties are ripe already! They’ve got a delicate floral, sweet-tart flavor and a great crunchy, crispy texture, more like an apple. They make a great snack and are a popular addition to salads. While often added to a green salad, they can also be combined with melon or watermelon or cucumber and avocado or make a slaw. If going a sweet route, you can poach, bake, sauté, or steam (this recipe for the Korean dessert baesuk includes steaming or poaching options), or make a quickbread or galette. They should be stored in the refrigerator in a bag.

Garlic

Melon – We grow several types of melons. To identify what you’ve got in your box, see the melon page on our website. In general, melons should be stored at room temperature in a cool spot. However if your melon is very ripe (and we do try to harvest them ripe!) move it to the refrigerator. Some of us enjoy our melons chilled and move them to the fridge to cool down before eating, while others prefer them at room temperature and let their refrigerated melons warm up before eating. Add melons to summer drinks, juice, and smoothies, fresh or frozen. We often just cut melons in half and eat them with a spoon, but if you want a recipe to add them to a dish, check out our website. NOTE: many melons have a blemish on one side, which can range from discoloration to small brown, pitted marks. This is the “ground spot,” where the melon was resting on the ground and it doesn’t mean a melon is bad or unsafe to eat.

Parsley –It’s very easy to use up a whole bunch of parsley if you make tabbouleh (with bulgur, quinoa, lentils, or pasta), a cilantro sauce (like one on this list), a parsley salad, or another parsley-heavy dish. But if you’re using it slowly and are looking to keep it fresh for a longer period, you should keep it in the refrigerator in a plastic bag, a plastic bag wrapped in a damp paper towel, or in a glass of water (like a bunch of flowers, or basil), also in the refrigerator. There’s debate about whether parsley in a jar should be refrigerated and if it should be covered with a bag; we recommend refrigeration with a bag to prevent it from drying out. Parsley goes with all summer produce so if you add a sprinkle here and there (like on potatoes in a salad or pan-fried, tomato salsa, fattoush salad, or peppers), you’ll definitely get through the bunch. Save a little bit for the Recipe of the Week.

Peppers – See our pepper page to see all the varieties we’re growing. All are sweet and can be enjoyed raw or cooked. Grilling or roasting peppers really brings out their sweetness and the thin-skinned peppers like Jimmy Nardellos cook very quickly. Roasted and grilled peppers can be marinated and can be added to salads, like the Recipe of the Week or a bread salad (panzanella) sandwiches, salads, pasta, and more. You can also make a quick meal like this gnocchi dish.

Potatoes – We recommend that you keep our potatoes in the refrigerator for optimal storage. One idea to combine with your tomatoes is this Italian casserole.

Tomatoes – Tomatoes are best stored on the counter at room temperature, stem side down. Keep an eye on them to monitor for ripeness. There is a lot of debate about refrigerating tomatoes; the best temperature for storing tomatoes is 55 degrees, much warmer than the standard refrigerator. As a result, we only recommend moving your tomatoes to the fridge when they are really ripe and you’re worried about them going bad. And of course, always refrigerate cut tomatoes. If refrigerating, take the whole or cut tomato out of the fridge to get back to room temperature before eating to get the best taste. See our website for other ideas.

*Click on produce above for Recipes

This Week's Flowers: a mixed bouquet

Veggie Tips

Asian Pears – Some Asian pear varieties ripen in the fall, but our varieties are ripe already! They’ve got a delicate floral, sweet-tart flavor and a great crunchy, crispy texture, more like an apple. They make a great snack and are a popular addition to salads. While often added to a green salad, they can also be combined with melon or watermelon or cucumber and avocado or make a slaw. If going a sweet route, you can poach, bake, sauté, or steam (this recipe for the Korean dessert baesuk includes steaming or poaching options), or make a quickbread or galette. They should be stored in the refrigerator in a bag.

Garlic

Melon – We grow several types of melons. To identify what you’ve got in your box, see the melon page on our website. In general, melons should be stored at room temperature in a cool spot. However if your melon is very ripe (and we do try to harvest them ripe!) move it to the refrigerator. Some of us enjoy our melons chilled and move them to the fridge to cool down before eating, while others prefer them at room temperature and let their refrigerated melons warm up before eating. Add melons to summer drinks, juice, and smoothies, fresh or frozen. We often just cut melons in half and eat them with a spoon, but if you want a recipe to add them to a dish, check out our website. NOTE: many melons have a blemish on one side, which can range from discoloration to small brown, pitted marks. This is the “ground spot,” where the melon was resting on the ground and it doesn’t mean a melon is bad or unsafe to eat.

Parsley –It’s very easy to use up a whole bunch of parsley if you make tabbouleh (with bulgur, quinoa, lentils, or pasta), a cilantro sauce (like one on this list), a parsley salad, or another parsley-heavy dish. But if you’re using it slowly and are looking to keep it fresh for a longer period, you should keep it in the refrigerator in a plastic bag, a plastic bag wrapped in a damp paper towel, or in a glass of water (like a bunch of flowers, or basil), also in the refrigerator. There’s debate about whether parsley in a jar should be refrigerated and if it should be covered with a bag; we recommend refrigeration with a bag to prevent it from drying out. Parsley goes with all summer produce so if you add a sprinkle here and there (like on potatoes in a salad or pan-fried, tomato salsa, fattoush salad, or peppers), you’ll definitely get through the bunch. Save a little bit for the Recipe of the Week.

Peppers – See our pepper page to see all the varieties we’re growing. All are sweet and can be enjoyed raw or cooked. Grilling or roasting peppers really brings out their sweetness and the thin-skinned peppers like Jimmy Nardellos cook very quickly. Roasted and grilled peppers can be marinated and can be added to salads, like the Recipe of the Week or a bread salad (panzanella) sandwiches, salads, pasta, and more. You can also make a quick meal like this gnocchi dish.

Potatoes – We recommend that you keep our potatoes in the refrigerator for optimal storage. One idea to combine with your tomatoes is this Italian casserole.

Tomatoes – Tomatoes are best stored on the counter at room temperature, stem side down. Keep an eye on them to monitor for ripeness. There is a lot of debate about refrigerating tomatoes; the best temperature for storing tomatoes is 55 degrees, much warmer than the standard refrigerator. As a result, we only recommend moving your tomatoes to the fridge when they are really ripe and you’re worried about them going bad. And of course, always refrigerate cut tomatoes. If refrigerating, take the whole or cut tomato out of the fridge to get back to room temperature before eating to get the best taste. See our website for other ideas.

*Click on produce above for Recipes

This Week's Flowers: a mixed bouquet

Veggie Tips

Asian Pears – Some Asian pear varieties ripen in the fall, but our varieties are ripe already! They’ve got a delicate floral, sweet-tart flavor and a great crunchy, crispy texture, more like an apple. They make a great snack and are a popular addition to salads. While often added to a green salad, they can also be combined with melon or watermelon, cucumber and avocado, tomato and basil, or make a slaw. If going a sweet route, you can poach, bake, sauté, or steam (this recipe for the Korean dessert Baesuk includes steaming or poaching options), or make a quickbread or galette. They should be stored in the refrigerator in a bag.

Basil – The best way to store basil is to trim the stems and place the bunch in a glass or jar of water, just like a bouquet of flowers. Loosely cover with a plastic bag and leave on the counter; don’t refrigerate! If too much condensation builds up, take the bag off to let the leaves dry out, or poke a few small holes in the bag. Save a few leaves for the Recipe of the Week. And use the rest for pasta, pesto and potatoes, garbanzos, a caprese salad, bruschetta, basil vinaigrette or basil sauce, or one of the recipes from our website.

Garlic

Melon – We grow several types of melons. To identify what you’ve got in your box, see the melon page on our website. In general, melons should be stored at room temperature in a cool spot. However if your melon is very ripe (and we do try to harvest them ripe!) move it to the refrigerator. Some of us enjoy our melons chilled and move them to the fridge to cool down before eating, while others prefer them at room temperature and let their refrigerated melons warm up before eating. Add melons to summer drinks, juice, and smoothies, fresh or frozen. We often just cut melons in half and eat them with a spoon, but if you want a recipe to add them to a dish, check out our website. NOTE: many melons have a blemish on one side, which can range from discoloration to small brown, pitted marks. This is the “ground spot,” where the melon was resting on the ground and it doesn’t mean a melon is bad or unsafe to eat.

Peppers – See our pepper page to see all the varieties we’re growing. All are sweet and can be enjoyed raw or cooked. Grilling or roasting peppers really brings out their sweetness and the thin-skinned peppers like Jimmy Nardellos cook very quickly. Roasted and grilled peppers can be marinated and can be added to salads, like the Recipe of the Week or a bread salad (panzanella) sandwiches, salads, pasta, and more. You can also make a quick meal like this gnocchi dish.

Potatoes – We recommend that you keep our potatoes in the refrigerator for optimal storage. One idea to combine with your tomatoes is this Italian casserole.

Tomatoes – Tomatoes are best stored on the counter at room temperature, stem side down. Keep an eye on them to monitor for ripeness. There is a lot of debate about refrigerating tomatoes; the best temperature for storing tomatoes is 55 degrees, much warmer than the standard refrigerator. As a result, we only recommend moving your tomatoes to the fridge when they are really ripe and you’re worried about them going bad. And of course, always refrigerate cut tomatoes. If refrigerating, take the whole or cut tomato out of the fridge to get back to room temperature before eating to get the best taste. See our website for other ideas.

*Click on produce above for Recipes

This Week's Flowers: a mixed bouquet

Veggie Tips

Asian Pears – Some Asian pear varieties ripen in the fall, but our varieties are ripe already! They’ve got a delicate floral, sweet-tart flavor and a great crunchy, crispy texture, more like an apple. They make a great snack and are a popular addition to salads. While often added to a green salad, they can also be combined with melon or watermelon or cucumber and avocado or make a slaw. If going a sweet route, you can poach, bake, sauté, or steam (this recipe for the Korean dessert baesuk includes steaming or poaching options), or make a quickbread or galette. They should be stored in the refrigerator in a bag.

Garlic

Melon – We grow several types of melons. To identify what you’ve got in your box, see the melon page on our website. In general, melons should be stored at room temperature in a cool spot. However if your melon is very ripe (and we do try to harvest them ripe!) move it to the refrigerator. Some of us enjoy our melons chilled and move them to the fridge to cool down before eating, while others prefer them at room temperature and let their refrigerated melons warm up before eating. Add melons to summer drinks, juice, and smoothies, fresh or frozen. We often just cut melons in half and eat them with a spoon, but if you want a recipe to add them to a dish, check out our website. NOTE: many melons have a blemish on one side, which can range from discoloration to small brown, pitted marks. This is the “ground spot,” where the melon was resting on the ground and it doesn’t mean a melon is bad or unsafe to eat.

Parsley –It’s very easy to use up a whole bunch of parsley if you make tabbouleh (with bulgur, quinoa, lentils, or pasta), a cilantro sauce (like one on this list), a parsley salad, or another parsley-heavy dish. But if you’re using it slowly and are looking to keep it fresh for a longer period, you should keep it in the refrigerator in a plastic bag, a plastic bag wrapped in a damp paper towel, or in a glass of water (like a bunch of flowers, or basil), also in the refrigerator. There’s debate about whether parsley in a jar should be refrigerated and if it should be covered with a bag; we recommend refrigeration with a bag to prevent it from drying out. Parsley goes with all summer produce so if you add a sprinkle here and there (like on potatoes in a salad or pan-fried, tomato salsa, fattoush salad, or peppers), you’ll definitely get through the bunch. Save a little bit for the Recipe of the Week.

Peppers – See our pepper page to see all the varieties we’re growing. All are sweet and can be enjoyed raw or cooked. Grilling or roasting peppers really brings out their sweetness and the thin-skinned peppers like Jimmy Nardellos cook very quickly. Roasted and grilled peppers can be marinated and can be added to salads, like the Recipe of the Week or a bread salad (panzanella) sandwiches, salads, pasta, and more. You can also make a quick meal like this gnocchi dish.

Potatoes – We recommend that you keep our potatoes in the refrigerator for optimal storage. One idea to combine with your tomatoes is this Italian casserole.

Tomatoes – Tomatoes are best stored on the counter at room temperature, stem side down. Keep an eye on them to monitor for ripeness. There is a lot of debate about refrigerating tomatoes; the best temperature for storing tomatoes is 55 degrees, much warmer than the standard refrigerator. As a result, we only recommend moving your tomatoes to the fridge when they are really ripe and you’re worried about them going bad. And of course, always refrigerate cut tomatoes. If refrigerating, take the whole or cut tomato out of the fridge to get back to room temperature before eating to get the best taste. See our website for other ideas.