What’s in my box this week?

Click on your delivery date to see what is in your box this week. Note that the web site is updated daily to reflect the NEXT day’s deliveries but before that, will show the information from the previous week. You can check an earlier day in the week to get an idea of what will be in your box, but the contents of your box may be different as the box contents frequently change between days.

*Click on produce above for Recipes

This Week's Flowers: a mixed bouquet of sunflowers, cayenne peppers, and broomcorn - last bouquet of the 2022 flower season! Enjoy!
*everything can be dried. After enjoying them in a vase with water (for a week), remove and hang upside down until dry. The peppers are also edible, fresh or dried, but are very spicy!

Veggie Tips

Butternut Squash – The fall equinox was last week but if you aren’t ready for winter squash yet, not a problem; butternut squash have a relatively long storage life. Store in a cool, dry place in your house (not your refrigerator) and the squash can last for two to three months, sometimes longer. But if you’re ready to start cooking now, butternut squash are versatile and there are so many good things to make, not just a pureed squash soup, which is good but can get old. You can make a smoothie, roast with your turnips, or cook with chard in the Recipe of the Week (or sautéed, roasted, minestrone, pasta and a chard pesto, enchiladas, or a simple bulgur recipe). You can even have it raw (here’s one recipe, there are others out there). See our squash page for many more recipe ideas.

Chard – The first leafy greens of fall! They made it through the heat wave and are looking great. Store in the refrigerator in a bag. And make sure not to discard the stems, as some recipes will tell you to do, they’re the most flavorful part of the plant, and it has a great texture. You can make something separate with the stems, like pickles or one of these other ideas, or just chop into small pieces and add a little sooner to your dish when cooking. See the Recipe of the Week for one idea!

Hakurei Turnips – These farm favorites go by several names: salad turnips, Tokyo turnips, and Japanese turnips. They’re called salad turnips because they have a sweet flavor and taste good raw, though they can also cooked (roasted, sautéed, boiled, grilled, steamed, mashed). They have a sweet taste and thin, tender skins; you don’t need to peel. Don’t discard the greens; they are tender and soft, with a mild taste. You can cook the greens with the turnips (sautéed, pan-roasted, or oven roasted) or use them raw anywhere you’d use arugula. To store: remove the greens and store the greens and roots in separate plastic bags in the fridge. The greens will last a week the roots have a much longer shelf-life.

Melon – See our recently updated melon page to identify your melon and for tips on storage! We’re nearing the end of the melon season and hopefully you’ve had a chance to try most, if not all, of what we grow. Recently several CSA members have asked how to know when a melon is ripe. The answer is that we harvest all of our melons ripe so while they can sit out on the counter ripen a bit more, they can also be enjoyed the day that you get them.

Onions

Pears – These are Fan-Stil pears! Pears should be stored on the counter at room temperature until they reach your preferred texture, which is a matter of personal preference. Some of us at the farm like them when they have a bit of crunch while others prefer to let them soften up a bit (when there is a slight give when you press on the flesh surrounding the stem – more descriptions of ripe pears here, here, or here). Pears are great just plain, but also make a great addition to salads, desserts, breakfast, and more (see the many recipe ideas here or from the Pear Bureau). You can also combine with your butternut (or honeynut from last week) roasted, sautéed, in crisp, or soup (plain, or with spices), salad (sub turnip greens for arugula), or with your turnips, poached or in a salad.

Shishito Peppers – Shishito peppers are most commonly blistered in a skillet with oil and salt (we've got a recipe on our pepper page) but you can also grill them (with scallions or with sesame and lime) or roast for approximately 15 minutes at 450 degrees (or utilize foil, like in this recipe). If you have eggplant from last week, you can make a phyllo pie (with your chard) or stir-fry. They can also be pickled (raw or blistered). We’ve got additional ideas on our website, including cooked with winter squash (braised with ginger and soy sauce or steamed with miso and sake.

*Click on produce above for Recipes

This Week's Flowers: a mixed bouquet of sunflowers, cayenne peppers, and broomcorn - last bouquet of the 2022 flower season! Enjoy!
*everything can be dried. After enjoying them in a vase with water (for a week), remove and hang upside down until dry. The peppers are also edible, fresh or dried, but are very spicy!

Veggie Tips

Butternut Squash – The fall equinox was last week but if you aren’t ready for winter squash yet, not a problem; butternut squash have a relatively long storage life. Store in a cool, dry place in your house (not your refrigerator) and the squash can last for two to three months, sometimes longer. But if you’re ready to start cooking now, butternut squash are versatile and there are so many good things to make, not just a pureed squash soup, which is good but can get old. You can make a smoothie, roast with your turnips, or cook with chard in the Recipe of the Week (or sautéed, roasted, minestrone, pasta and a chard pesto, enchiladas, or a simple bulgur recipe). You can even have it raw (here’s one recipe, there are others out there). See our squash page for many more recipe ideas.

Chard – The first leafy greens of fall! They made it through the heat wave and are looking great. Store in the refrigerator in a bag. And make sure not to discard the stems, as some recipes will tell you to do, they’re the most flavorful part of the plant, and it has a great texture. You can make something separate with the stems, like pickles or one of these other ideas, or just chop into small pieces and add a little sooner to your dish when cooking. See the Recipe of the Week for one idea!

Hakurei Turnips – These farm favorites go by several names: salad turnips, Tokyo turnips, and Japanese turnips. They’re called salad turnips because they have a sweet flavor and taste good raw, though they can also cooked (roasted, sautéed, boiled, grilled, steamed, mashed). They have a sweet taste and thin, tender skins; you don’t need to peel. Don’t discard the greens; they are tender and soft, with a mild taste. You can cook the greens with the turnips (sautéed, pan-roasted, or oven roasted) or use them raw anywhere you’d use arugula. To store: remove the greens and store the greens and roots in separate plastic bags in the fridge. The greens will last a week the roots have a much longer shelf-life.

Melon – See our recently updated melon page to identify your melon and for tips on storage! We’re nearing the end of the melon season and hopefully you’ve had a chance to try most, if not all, of what we grow. Recently several CSA members have asked how to know when a melon is ripe. The answer is that we harvest all of our melons ripe so while they can sit out on the counter ripen a bit more, they can also be enjoyed the day that you get them.

Onions

Pears – These are Fan-Stil pears! Pears should be stored on the counter at room temperature until they reach your preferred texture, which is a matter of personal preference. Some of us at the farm like them when they have a bit of crunch while others prefer to let them soften up a bit (when there is a slight give when you press on the flesh surrounding the stem – more descriptions of ripe pears here, here, or here). Pears are great just plain, but also make a great addition to salads, desserts, breakfast, and more (see the many recipe ideas here or from the Pear Bureau). You can also combine with your butternut (or honeynut from last week) roasted, sautéed, in crisp, or soup (plain, or with spices), salad (sub turnip greens for arugula), or with your turnips, poached or in a salad.

Shishito Peppers – Shishito peppers are most commonly blistered in a skillet with oil and salt (we've got a recipe on our pepper page) but you can also grill them (with scallions or with sesame and lime) or roast for approximately 15 minutes at 450 degrees (or utilize foil, like in this recipe). If you have eggplant from last week, you can make a phyllo pie (with your chard) or stir-fry. They can also be pickled (raw or blistered). We’ve got additional ideas on our website, including cooked with winter squash (braised with ginger and soy sauce or steamed with miso and sake.

*Click on produce above for Recipes

This Week's Flowers: mixed bouquet

Veggie Tips

Cherry Tomatoes – Store your cherry tomatoes on the counter, not the refrigerator, just like you would larger tomatoes. Save a few for the Recipe of the Week. They make a great snack or can be added to almost any dish (including gnocchi with honeynut squash)!

Eggplant – We grow several types of eggplant, all of which are listed on our website’s eggplant page, along with many great recipe ideas. The different shaped eggplants can be used interchangeably, just adjust the way you cut them depending on the recipe. While you’ll see suggestions online not to store eggplants in the refrigerator, we do recommend that you refrigerate (in a warmer section of your fridge, if possible) in a bag to prevent them from getting squishy (though if they do, try making baingan bharta). See the Recipe of the Week for one great idea (it’s so good – I’ve made it once a week the past few weeks!) or if that's not your style: a curry with winter squash, grilled with cumin and feta, sautéed with a spicy miso sauce, or with orzo and pesto. If you still have basil from last week, eggplant and basil make a great combination, like in this roasted eggplant recipe, a grain bowl or there’s always pasta, a sandwich, or curry. Apparently you can incorporate eggplant into desserts (with chocolate or in a cake). Has anyone ever tried? Do you have a favorite eggplant dish? If so – send it our way; we’d love to share it with other CSA members.

Grapes

Honeynut Squash – Honeynut squash are like miniature butternuts with a sweeter, more concentrated nutty flavor. Because of their sweetness, they’re phenomenal roasted so that they sugars caramelize, though they can also be cooked on the stove. They’re excellent plain, but are also great stuffed or included in any of your favorite winter squash dishes (soup, risotto, gnocchi, twice-stuffed, or even cookies), and can be substituted for butternut squash. Try it with eggplant! They don’t store as long as butternut but don’t need to be eaten immediately. They are notorious for getting wrinkly fast, but don’t discard if this happens to you; they are still fine to eat and haven’t gone bad.

Melon – See our recently updated melon page to identify your melon and for tips on storage! We’re nearing the end of the melon season and hopefully you’ve had a chance to try most, if not all, of what we grow. Recently several CSA members have asked how to know when a melon is ripe. The answer is that we harvest all of our melons ripe so while they can sit out on the counter ripen a bit more, they can also be enjoyed the day that you get them.

Onions

Pears – These are Fan-Stil pears! Pears should be stored on the counter at room temperature until they reach your preferred texture, which is a matter of personal preference. Some of us at the farm like them when they have a bit of crunch while others prefer to let them soften up a bit (when there is a slight give when you press on the flesh surrounding the stem. Pears are great just plain, but also make a great addition to salads, desserts, oatmeal (raw or cooked – roasted or a compote), and more.

*Click on produce above for Recipes

This Week's Flowers: mixed bouquet

Veggie Tips

Cherry Tomatoes – Store your cherry tomatoes on the counter, not the refrigerator, just like you would larger tomatoes. Save a few for the Recipe of the Week. They make a great snack or can be added to almost any dish (including gnocchi with honeynut squash)!

Eggplant – We grow several types of eggplant, all of which are listed on our website’s eggplant page, along with many great recipe ideas. The different shaped eggplants can be used interchangeably, just adjust the way you cut them depending on the recipe. While you’ll see suggestions online not to store eggplants in the refrigerator, we do recommend that you refrigerate (in a warmer section of your fridge, if possible) in a bag to prevent them from getting squishy (though if they do, try making baingan bharta). See the Recipe of the Week for one great idea (it’s so good – I’ve made it once a week the past few weeks!) or if that's not your style: a curry with winter squash, grilled with cumin and feta, sautéed with a spicy miso sauce, or with orzo and pesto. If you still have basil from last week, eggplant and basil make a great combination, like in this roasted eggplant recipe, a grain bowl or there’s always pasta, a sandwich, or curry. Apparently you can incorporate eggplant into desserts (with chocolate or in a cake). Has anyone ever tried? Do you have a favorite eggplant dish? If so – send it our way; we’d love to share it with other CSA members.

Grapes

Honeynut Squash – Honeynut squash are like miniature butternuts with a sweeter, more concentrated nutty flavor. Because of their sweetness, they’re phenomenal roasted so that they sugars caramelize, though they can also be cooked on the stove. They’re excellent plain, but are also great stuffed or included in any of your favorite winter squash dishes (soup, risotto, gnocchi, twice-stuffed, or even cookies), and can be substituted for butternut squash. Try it with eggplant! They don’t store as long as butternut but don’t need to be eaten immediately. They are notorious for getting wrinkly fast, but don’t discard if this happens to you; they are still fine to eat and haven’t gone bad.

Melon – See our recently updated melon page to identify your melon and for tips on storage! We’re nearing the end of the melon season and hopefully you’ve had a chance to try most, if not all, of what we grow. Recently several CSA members have asked how to know when a melon is ripe. The answer is that we harvest all of our melons ripe so while they can sit out on the counter ripen a bit more, they can also be enjoyed the day that you get them.

Onions

Pears – These are Fan-Stil pears! Pears should be stored on the counter at room temperature until they reach your preferred texture, which is a matter of personal preference. Some of us at the farm like them when they have a bit of crunch while others prefer to let them soften up a bit (when there is a slight give when you press on the flesh surrounding the stem. Pears are great just plain, but also make a great addition to salads, desserts, oatmeal (raw or cooked – roasted or a compote), and more.

*Click on produce above for Recipes

This Week's Flowers: mixed bouquet

Veggie Tips

Cherry Tomatoes – Store your cherry tomatoes on the counter, not the refrigerator, just like you would larger tomatoes. Save a few for the Recipe of the Week. They make a great snack or can be added to almost any dish (including gnocchi with honeynut squash)!

Eggplant – We grow several types of eggplant, all of which are listed on our website’s eggplant page, along with many great recipe ideas. The different shaped eggplants can be used interchangeably, just adjust the way you cut them depending on the recipe. While you’ll see suggestions online not to store eggplants in the refrigerator, we do recommend that you refrigerate (in a warmer section of your fridge, if possible) in a bag to prevent them from getting squishy (though if they do, try making baingan bharta). See the Recipe of the Week for one great idea (it’s so good – I’ve made it once a week the past few weeks!) or if that's not your style: a curry with winter squash, grilled with cumin and feta, sautéed with a spicy miso sauce, or with orzo and pesto. If you still have basil from last week, eggplant and basil make a great combination, like in this roasted eggplant recipe, a grain bowl or there’s always pasta, a sandwich, or curry. Apparently you can incorporate eggplant into desserts (with chocolate or in a cake). Has anyone ever tried? Do you have a favorite eggplant dish? If so – send it our way; we’d love to share it with other CSA members.

Grapes

Honeynut Squash – Honeynut squash are like miniature butternuts with a sweeter, more concentrated nutty flavor. Because of their sweetness, they’re phenomenal roasted so that they sugars caramelize, though they can also be cooked on the stove. They’re excellent plain, but are also great stuffed or included in any of your favorite winter squash dishes (soup, risotto, gnocchi, twice-stuffed, or even cookies), and can be substituted for butternut squash. Try it with eggplant! They don’t store as long as butternut but don’t need to be eaten immediately. They are notorious for getting wrinkly fast, but don’t discard if this happens to you; they are still fine to eat and haven’t gone bad.

Melon – See our recently updated melon page to identify your melon and for tips on storage! We’re nearing the end of the melon season and hopefully you’ve had a chance to try most, if not all, of what we grow. Recently several CSA members have asked how to know when a melon is ripe. The answer is that we harvest all of our melons ripe so while they can sit out on the counter ripen a bit more, they can also be enjoyed the day that you get them.

Onions

Pears – These are Fan-Stil pears! Pears should be stored on the counter at room temperature until they reach your preferred texture, which is a matter of personal preference. Some of us at the farm like them when they have a bit of crunch while others prefer to let them soften up a bit (when there is a slight give when you press on the flesh surrounding the stem. Pears are great just plain, but also make a great addition to salads, desserts, oatmeal (raw or cooked – roasted or a compote), and more.