What’s in my box this week?

Click on your delivery date to see what is in your box this week. Note that the web site is updated daily to reflect the NEXT day’s deliveries but before that, will show the information from the previous week. You can check an earlier day in the week to get an idea of what will be in your box, but the contents of your box may be different as the box contents frequently change between days.

*Click on produce above for Recipes

This Week's Flowers: a mixed bouquet

Veggie Tips

Arugula – what can’t arugula do? It makes an excellent raw salad, can be lightly wilted on a warm dish (pasta, soup, and more), or can be sautéed. Cooking can bring down the spiciness, but be warned that it will shrink a lot! If you want to combine multiple items in your box, how about new potatoes and arugula salad (with or without lentils, or with grilled potatoes), or with roasted carrots in a green salad or a grain salad, or a frittata with onions? You can also make pesto. Like with all leafy greens, it should be stored in the refrigerator in a plastic bag and/or in your crisper drawer.

Carrots – remember to separate the greens from the roots before storing. They don’t last long around here, but if you want some tips on longer-term storage, read this article. We love snacking on them whole, but there are other ways to enjoy them too: in a grated salad, pickled (try this recipe if you still have your fennel from last week!), sautéed, grilled, as the base for a soup, or carrot cake, muffins, or cookies! Other recipes ideas on our website.

Hakurei Turnips – also called salad turnips for their sweet and crunchy taste when raw, they are an excellent addition to a salad or slaw. Try this salad! Or they can also be cooked. They work in any recipe that calls for radishes, they have a similar texture but lack the spiciness. They pair well with other spring produce like carrots and new potatoes. Definitely don’t discard the greens, which have a sweet and earthy taste and tender texture and can be eaten raw or cooked. Add them in to whatever you choose to use the roots for, be it soup, pasta, a skillet with eggs, couscous, or a simple sauté. Additional recipe ideas on our website.

Lettuce

New Potatoes – remember to store your potatoes in the refrigerator; new potatoes have very thin skins and are highly perishable. Otherwise, they can be used anywhere you’d use “old” potatoes. Consider having your potatoes with the spinach in your box this week: first boiled and then cooked in a pan with spinach and capers, in a lemony soup, or roasted in a salad, with curry spices or garlic.

Onions – the onions haven’t been cured yet, so they aren’t suitable for long-term storage in your pantry but if you’re using it within a week, it’s not necessary to refrigerate, especially if you’re short on fridge space!

Spinach – see the Recipe of the Week.

*Click on produce above for Recipes

This Week's Flowers: a mixed bouquet

Veggie Tips

Arugula – what can’t arugula do? It makes an excellent raw salad, can be lightly wilted on a warm dish (pasta, soup, and more), or can be sautéed. Cooking can bring down the spiciness, but be warned that it will shrink a lot! If you want to combine multiple items in your box, how about new potatoes and arugula salad (with or without lentils, or with grilled potatoes), or with roasted carrots in a green salad or a grain salad, or a frittata with onions? You can also make pesto. Like with all leafy greens, it should be stored in the refrigerator in a plastic bag and/or in your crisper drawer.

Carrots – remember to separate the greens from the roots before storing. They don’t last long around here, but if you want some tips on longer-term storage, read this article. We love snacking on them whole, but there are other ways to enjoy them too: in a grated salad, pickled (try this recipe if you still have your fennel from last week!), sautéed, grilled, as the base for a soup, or carrot cake, muffins, or cookies! Other recipes ideas on our website.

Hakurei Turnips – also called salad turnips for their sweet and crunchy taste when raw, they are an excellent addition to a salad or slaw. Try this salad! Or they can also be cooked. They work in any recipe that calls for radishes, they have a similar texture but lack the spiciness. They pair well with other spring produce like carrots and new potatoes. Definitely don’t discard the greens, which have a sweet and earthy taste and tender texture and can be eaten raw or cooked. Add them in to whatever you choose to use the roots for, be it soup, pasta, a skillet with eggs, couscous, or a simple sauté. Additional recipe ideas on our website.

Lettuce

New Potatoes – remember to store your potatoes in the refrigerator; new potatoes have very thin skins and are highly perishable. Otherwise, they can be used anywhere you’d use “old” potatoes. Consider having your potatoes with the spinach in your box this week: first boiled and then cooked in a pan with spinach and capers, in a lemony soup, or roasted in a salad, with curry spices or garlic.

Onions – the onions haven’t been cured yet, so they aren’t suitable for long-term storage in your pantry but if you’re using it within a week, it’s not necessary to refrigerate, especially if you’re short on fridge space!

Spinach – see the Recipe of the Week.

*Click on produce above for Recipes

This Week's Flowers: a nigella and sunflower duet!

Veggie Tips

Beets – you’ve got beets in your box this week! We grow three types (red beets, Chioggia, and gold). They can all be prepared in a similar way, and can be used interchangeably. The greens are beautiful and tasty, so make sure to use them too. They have a similar taste to chard, but are a bit thicker, so you may need to cook them a little longer - basic sauté instructions with lots of recipe ideas here. (though you can cook with other spices and seasonings, like this recipe). You can also make them into a soup, omelette, Indian lentil dal or lentil dish. They can also be cooked with the roots. Here is a flexible and easy Ukranian borsch recipe and borscht with the greens and cabbage or barley, a puree, or a stir-fry, with Indian spices or with tofu, garlic and ginger. Cooked beets make a good addition to a lettuce, kale, or grain/bean salad. For a rundown of many beet preparation methods, check out this website. Additional recipes on our website. We recommend separating the greens from the roots when you get home to keep the roots at their freshest.

Cabbage – cabbage doesn’t need any fancy preparation to taste good and can be enjoyed raw or cooked. You can sear it and serve with a carrot top sauce or try it grilled! See the Recipe of the Week, or our website for many excellent recipe ideas.

Carrots – try your carrots and beets together! Try roasted (with farro, carrot top pesto, or tahini sauce, or raw (in a salad, grated with fennel, or with rice), in hummus, or muffins. Remember to separate the greens from the roots for storage.

Fennel – do you prefer your fennel cooked? Or raw? If raw, there are so many tasty salads you can make with your fennel (to provide just a few ideas: with beets, Parmesan, or beans). If cooking, you can make a soup with beets, an Indian cabbage sauté, braised, gratin, or roasted on toast. Additionally, many people make the fronds into a pesto. More recipe ideas on our website.

Lettuce

New Potatoes  - new potatoes are the first potatoes we dig up of each potato harvest. The skins are very thin and fragile and might get a little scuffed in the harvesting and washing process. They have a less starch and more water than older potatoes so they’re very creamy, but they can be used as you would any “less-new” potato (steamed, sautéed, boiled, baked, roasted, fried, grilled, etc.). We have lots of recipes on our website. They really don’t need much to shine, and can be prepared very simply. But you also don’t need to just eat them plain; you can make Indian-ish baked potatoes, a “maximalist” potato salad, with sticky caramel Sichuan peppercorn sauce, roasted with fennel, or any of these recipes (a beet salad, a hash, focaccia, and more).

Onions – the onions haven’t been cured yet, so they aren’t suitable for long-term storage in your pantry but if you’re using it within a week, it’s not necessary to refrigerate, especially if you’re short on fridge space!

*Click on produce above for Recipes

This Week's Flowers: a nigella and sunflower duet!

Veggie Tips

Beets – you’ve got beets in your box this week! We grow three types (red beets, Chioggia, and gold). They can all be prepared in a similar way, and can be used interchangeably. The greens are beautiful and tasty, so make sure to use them too. They have a similar taste to chard, but are a bit thicker, so you may need to cook them a little longer - basic sauté instructions with lots of recipe ideas here. (though you can cook with other spices and seasonings, like this recipe). You can also make them into a soup, omelette, Indian lentil dal or lentil dish. They can also be cooked with the roots. Here is a flexible and easy Ukranian borsch recipe and borscht with the greens and cabbage or barley, a puree, or a stir-fry, with Indian spices or with tofu, garlic and ginger. Cooked beets make a good addition to a lettuce, kale, or grain/bean salad. For a rundown of many beet preparation methods, check out this website. Additional recipes on our website. We recommend separating the greens from the roots when you get home to keep the roots at their freshest.

Cabbage – cabbage doesn’t need any fancy preparation to taste good and can be enjoyed raw or cooked. You can sear it and serve with a carrot top sauce or try it grilled! See the Recipe of the Week, or our website for many excellent recipe ideas.

Carrots – try your carrots and beets together! Try roasted (with farro, carrot top pesto, or tahini sauce, or raw (in a salad, grated with fennel, or with rice), in hummus, or muffins. Remember to separate the greens from the roots for storage.

Fennel – do you prefer your fennel cooked? Or raw? If raw, there are so many tasty salads you can make with your fennel (to provide just a few ideas: with beets, Parmesan, or beans). If cooking, you can make a soup with beets, an Indian cabbage sauté, braised, gratin, or roasted on toast. Additionally, many people make the fronds into a pesto. More recipe ideas on our website.

Lettuce

New Potatoes  - new potatoes are the first potatoes we dig up of each potato harvest. The skins are very thin and fragile and might get a little scuffed in the harvesting and washing process. They have a less starch and more water than older potatoes so they’re very creamy, but they can be used as you would any “less-new” potato (steamed, sautéed, boiled, baked, roasted, fried, grilled, etc.). We have lots of recipes on our website. They really don’t need much to shine, and can be prepared very simply. But you also don’t need to just eat them plain; you can make Indian-ish baked potatoes, a “maximalist” potato salad, with sticky caramel Sichuan peppercorn sauce, roasted with fennel, or any of these recipes (a beet salad, a hash, focaccia, and more).

Onions – the onions haven’t been cured yet, so they aren’t suitable for long-term storage in your pantry but if you’re using it within a week, it’s not necessary to refrigerate, especially if you’re short on fridge space!

*Click on produce above for Recipes

This Week's Flowers: a nigella and sunflower duet!

Veggie Tips

Beets – you’ve got beets in your box this week! We grow three types (red beets, Chioggia, and gold). They can all be prepared in a similar way, and can be used interchangeably. The greens are beautiful and tasty, so make sure to use them too. They have a similar taste to chard, but are a bit thicker, so you may need to cook them a little longer - basic sauté instructions with lots of recipe ideas here. (though you can cook with other spices and seasonings, like this recipe). You can also make them into a soup, omelette, Indian lentil dal or lentil dish. They can also be cooked with the roots. Here is a flexible and easy Ukranian borsch recipe and borscht with the greens and cabbage or barley, a puree, or a stir-fry, with Indian spices or with tofu, garlic and ginger. Cooked beets make a good addition to a lettuce, kale, or grain/bean salad. For a rundown of many beet preparation methods, check out this website. Additional recipes on our website. We recommend separating the greens from the roots when you get home to keep the roots at their freshest.

Cabbage – cabbage doesn’t need any fancy preparation to taste good and can be enjoyed raw or cooked. You can sear it and serve with a carrot top sauce or try it grilled! See the Recipe of the Week, or our website for many excellent recipe ideas.

Carrots – try your carrots and beets together! Try roasted (with farro, carrot top pesto, or tahini sauce, or raw (in a salad, grated with fennel, or with rice), in hummus, or muffins. Remember to separate the greens from the roots for storage.

Fennel – do you prefer your fennel cooked? Or raw? If raw, there are so many tasty salads you can make with your fennel (to provide just a few ideas: with beets, Parmesan, or beans). If cooking, you can make a soup with beets, an Indian cabbage sauté, braised, gratin, or roasted on toast. Additionally, many people make the fronds into a pesto. More recipe ideas on our website.

Lettuce

New Potatoes  - new potatoes are the first potatoes we dig up of each potato harvest. The skins are very thin and fragile and might get a little scuffed in the harvesting and washing process. They have a less starch and more water than older potatoes so they’re very creamy, but they can be used as you would any “less-new” potato (steamed, sautéed, boiled, baked, roasted, fried, grilled, etc.). We have lots of recipes on our website. They really don’t need much to shine, and can be prepared very simply. But you also don’t need to just eat them plain; you can make Indian-ish baked potatoes, a “maximalist” potato salad, with sticky caramel Sichuan peppercorn sauce, roasted with fennel, or any of these recipes (a beet salad, a hash, focaccia, and more).

Onions – the onions haven’t been cured yet, so they aren’t suitable for long-term storage in your pantry but if you’re using it within a week, it’s not necessary to refrigerate, especially if you’re short on fridge space!